BEAM Expanded To Full Size

BEAM Expansion
The BEAM expansion took several hours today as astronaut Jeff Williams sent two dozen pulses of air into the expandable module. Credit: NASA TV

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) was expanded to its full size at 4:10 p.m. EDT.  Expansion was completed as the International Space Station flew over the south Pacific at an altitude of 252 miles. The NASA and Bigelow Aerospace teams working with NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams will now begin the final step to open eight tanks of air stored within the BEAM to pressurize the module. NASA Television coverage continues and can be seen at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams and the NASA and Bigelow Aerospace teams working at Mission Control Center at NASA’s Johnson Space Center spent more than seven hours on operations to fill the BEAM with air to cause it to expand.

Williams opened the valve 25 times today for a total time of 2 minutes and 27 seconds to add air to the module in short bursts as flight controllers carefully monitored the module’s internal pressure. Time in between bursts allowed the module to stabilize and expand.

From the beginning of operations at 9:04 a.m. EDT, the module added 61 inches in length to reach 67 inches beyond its packed configuration and an internal diameter of 127 inches. Its final length will be 158 inches, and its final diameter will be 127 inches.

BEAM is a technology demonstration from which we will learn more about how these types of habitats will perform in a microgravity environment. It will remain attached to station for a two-year test period.

For more information about BEAM, visit: www.nasa.gov/beam. For more information about the International Space Station, visit: www.nasa.gov/station. For additional live coverage of expansion, follow @Space_Station on Twitter.

BEAM Coverage on NASA TV Contunues

BEAM Expansion Coverage on NASA TV
BEAM expansion coverage continues on NASA TV.

NASA Television coverage is again underway for the operations to resume shortly to add air to the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) attached to the International Space Station. NASA TV can be seen at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

The module has been slowly expanding for the last three hours as NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams has introduced eight short bursts of air to the BEAM, allowing the module to stabilize and expand in between bursts as flight controllers monitor the operation.

For more information about BEAM, visit: www.nasa.gov/beam. For more information about the International Space Station, visit: www.nasa.gov/station. For additional live coverage of expansion, follow @Space_Station on Twitter.

NASA TV BEAM Coverage on Break

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module
BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, is depicted in its expanded configuration in this computer rendering.

NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams has continued to add air to the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) in a series of short bursts during operations aboard the International Space Station today. A total of 44 seconds of air has been introduced during eight bursts.

Flight controllers are monitoring the operation as the module slowly expands. BEAM has expanded at least 16 inches in length and at least seven inches in diameter since the first burst at 9:04 a.m. EDT.

The team will take another break until the International Space Station again has television capability so flight controllers can monitor the expansion. NASA Television coverage from Mission Control Center at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston will resume at 12:10 p.m. EDT and can be viewed at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

For more information about BEAM, visit: www.nasa.gov/beam. For more information about the International Space Station, visit: www.nasa.gov/station.

BEAM Operations Resuming

NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams
NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams monitors BEAM from the Tranquility module during expansion. Credit: NASA TV

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace are resuming operations to expand the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), currently attached to the International Space Station. NASA Television coverage is again underway and can be seen at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

During operations this morning, NASA Astronaut Jeff Williams introduced four pulses of air into the BEAM during a total 34 seconds. Time in between bursts allows the module to stabilize and expand in between. Flight controllers have confirmed the module is expanding both in length and diameter.

The teams are expected to resume expansion operations momentarily.

For more information about BEAM, visit: www.nasa.gov/beam. For more information about the International Space Station, visit: www.nasa.gov/station. For additional live coverage of expansion, follow @Space_Station on Twitter.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module Expansion Underway

BEAM Installation
This computer rendering depicts the installation of BEAM on the Tranquility module using the Canadarm2. Credit: NASA

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace is making a second attempt this morning  to expand the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM), currently attached to the International Space Station. NASA Television coverage is underway and can be seen at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv 

During initial operations Thursday to expand BEAM, the module’s length and diameter did not increase with the increased internal pressure, as expected. Teams stood down from operations for the day and engineers depressurized the habitat Friday afternoon.

 NASA astronaut Jeff Williams again is leading operations to expand the module while they are in position to work in the sunlight and with downlink television capability for flight controllers to monitor the expansion.

 Expandable habitats are designed to take up less room on a spacecraft, but provide greater volume for living and working in space once expanded. This first test of an expandable module will allow investigators to gauge how well the habitat performs and specifically, how well it protects against solar radiation, space debris and the temperature extremes of space.

 For more information about BEAM, visit: www.nasa.gov/beam. For more information about the International Space Station, visit: www.nasa.gov/station. For additional live coverage of expansion, follow @Space_Station on Twitter.

 

BEAM Media Teleconference Rescheduled for 2 P.M. EDT

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module
BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, is depicted in its expanded configuration in this computer rendering.

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace have rescheduled their media teleconference for today from noon EDT to 2 p.m. to discuss the status of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM). Engineering teams monitored the module overnight for structural changes after attempts to fully expand the module yesterday were unsuccessful. They have been meeting throughout the morning to discuss the next steps.

With the exception of the change in time, call-in details remain the same for any reporters who have already registered to participate. To participate in the teleconference, media must contact Cheryl Warner at cheryl.m.warner@nasa.gov or Tabatha Thompson at tabatha.t.thompson@nasa.gov, or call 202-358-1100 for call details. The teleconference will stream live at www.nasa.gov/newsaudio.

BEAM is a technology demonstration from which we will learn more about how these types of habitats will perform in a microgravity environment.

For more information about BEAM, visit: www.nasa.gov/beam. For more information about the International Space Station, visit: www.nasa.gov/station.

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace to Discuss BEAM Friday

Canadarm2 Installs BEAM
The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) was installed to the International Space Station on April 16, 2016 using the Canadarm2 robotic arm.

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace are continuing to evaluate why the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) did not fully expand today as planned and will not attempt to complete the module’s expansion on Friday. Engineering teams will monitor the module overnight for structural changes that could result in either larger volume or lower internal pressure before meeting on Friday morning to discuss options moving forward. Ground teams will look for any changes in the module’s shape following the conclusion of Thursday’s operations and the station crew will take additional pressure readings. Crew members aboard the International Space Station are safe, and both BEAM and the space station are in a stable configuration.

During about two hours of expansion, BEAM’s length and diameter did not increase as expected with the increased internal pressure, and teams decided to stand down from operations for the day.

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace will host a media teleconference Friday, May 27 at 12 p.m. EDT to discuss BEAM. To participate in the teleconference, media must contact Cheryl Warner at cheryl.m.warner@nasa.gov or Tabatha Thompson at tabatha.t.thompson@nasa.gov or call 202-358-1100. The teleconference will stream live at www.nasa.gov/newsaudio.

BEAM is a technology demonstration from which we will learn more about how these types of habitats will perform in a microgravity environment.

For more information about BEAM, visit: www.nasa.gov/beam. For more information about the International Space Station, visit: www.nasa.gov/station.

Station Gets Ready for BEAM Expansion

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module
BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, is highlighted in its expanded configuration in this computer rendering.

The Expedition 47 crew is getting a new module recently attached to the Tranquility module ready for expansion later this week. The International Space Station residents are also running experiments today exploring a wide variety of phenomena and checking station gear.

BEAM, or the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, is scheduled to expand to full pressurized volume Thursday morning. In preparation, the crew is installing computer cables, checking connections and verifying hardware prior to BEAM deployment. NASA TV will televise the BEAM expansion activities live. Crew entry into the new module is scheduled for next week but will not be televised.

The Rodent Research-3 (RR-3) experiment was completed last week and the astronauts are cleaning up and inventorying the gear today. During the wrap up work, the crew also collected station air and astronaut breath samples for the Marrow bone study sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency.

Some of the station hardware that helps run and monitor equipment and experiments is getting new gear and upgrades. The Microgravity Science Glovebox, which housed the RR-3 activities last week, is being prepared for video equipment upgrades. A new laptop computer is being loaded with software to demonstrate control of station assets from both the orbital lab and the ground.