NASA TV Coverage of Spacewalk Underway

Astronauts (from left) Chris Cassidy and Bob Behnken are pictured during previous spacewalks on earlier missions at the space station.
Astronauts (from left) Chris Cassidy and Bob Behnken are pictured during previous spacewalks on earlier missions at the space station.

NASA Television coverage of today’s spacewalk with NASA astronauts Chris Cassidy and Robert Behnken is now underway and available on the agency’s website.

The crew members of Expedition 63 are preparing to venture outside the International Space Station for a spacewalk expected to begin at approximately 7:35 a.m. EDT and last as long as seven hours.

The crew is in the airlock and have donned their suits in preparation to exit the airlock and begin today’s activities working on one of two power channels on the far starboard truss (S6 Truss) of the station.

The primary tasks for today, as illustrated in a NASA animation, are to remove three existing nickel-hydrogen batteries and replace them with two new lithium-ion batteries. The batteries store electricity for one pair of the station’s solar arrays. Cassidy and Hurley also will be installing an adapter plate to complete the circuit to the new batteries and relocating the nickel-hydrogen batteries, two of which will be moved to an external platform for future disposal.

Leading the mission control team today is Flight Director Royce Renfrew with support from Jackie Kagey as the lead spacewalk officer.

Learn more about station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Crew Focusing on Science Today as Spacewalk Nears

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy is pictured during a spacewalk in July of 2013
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy is pictured during a spacewalk in July of 2013 when he was an Expedition 36 Flight Engineer.

The Expedition 63 crew lightened up on spacewalk preparations and focused its attention on a variety of research hardware today. The International Space Station residents also brushed up on their medical emergency skills while tending a pair of resupply ships.

Following a day of spacesuit fit checks, the three NASA astronauts aboard the orbiting lab split up on Wednesday to keep space science moving along. Commander Chris Cassidy started the day servicing a science freezer that stores biological samples for analysis. During the afternoon, Cassidy checked on samples for a physics study with commercial applications taking place in the Fluid Science Laboratory rack.

Flight Engineer Doug Hurley stowed hardware from a space bubbles study that was exploring new methods to deliver oxygen to spacecraft and medicine to humans. His fellow crewmate, Bob Behnken, was troubleshooting the TangoLab-2 science facility before packing gear inside Japan’s HTV-9 resupply ship.

The duo ended the day conducting a medical emergency drill in space. Hurley and Behnken practiced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques, located medical equipment and coordinated communications with mission controllers.

Hurley also joined cosmonaut Ivan Vagner in the morning and reviewed their responsibilities to assist Cassidy and Behnken during Friday’s spacewalk. Hurley and Vagner will help the astronauts in and out of their spacesuits and monitor the spacewalk scheduled to start about 7:35 a.m. EDT. NASA TV begins its live broadcast at 6 a.m.

Vagner then partnered up with veteran cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin for cargo operations inside Russia’s Progress 74 cargo craft. Ivanishin spent the rest of the day working on Russian science experiments and life support maintenance.

Astronauts Check Spacewalk Tools and Suits, Study Space Physics

NASA astronauts (from top) Chris Cassidy and Bob Behnken work on U.S. spacesuits inside the International Space Station's Quest airlock.
NASA astronauts (from top) Chris Cassidy and Bob Behnken work on U.S. spacesuits inside the International Space Station’s Quest airlock.

Two NASA astronauts are getting ready for Friday’s spacewalk to continue upgrading power systems on the International Space Station. The other three Expedition 63 crewmembers today explored a variety of microgravity phenomena to improve health and industry on Earth and in space.

Commander Chris Cassidy and Flight Engineer Bob Behnken spent Monday afternoon reviewing the tools and procedures they will use during Friday’s spacewalk. They were joined by fellow NASA astronaut Doug Hurley who will assist the duo in and out of their spacesuits and monitor their spacewalk activities. The two spacewalkers then checked their U.S. spacesuits and organized the Quest airlock where they will stage Friday’s excursion.

Cassidy and Behnken will set their spacesuits to internal power on Friday around 7:35 a.m. EDT officially beginning their spacewalk. The duo will swap old nickel-hydrogen batteries with new lithium-ion batteries on the Starboard-6 truss structure. The batteries store power collected from the station’s main solar arrays and distribute it throughout the orbiting lab.

Hurley spent the first half of his Monday working on fluid and combustion physics. He first explored how microfluidics can cause biochemical reactions in blood revealing mechanisms hidden on Earth. Next, he researched fabricating composite materials to learn how to repair and build structures on future space missions.

Cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin serviced laptop computers and stowed hardware used during a plasma crystal study in the station’s Russian segment. Fellow cosmonaut Ivan Vagner configured cameras then worked on a study that provides high precision predictions of the station’s motion and orbit.

Crew Readies Satellite and Organizes Station

NASA astronauts Doug Hurley (foreground) and Bob Behnken talk to mission controllers on the ground.
NASA astronauts Doug Hurley (foreground) and Bob Behnken talk to mission controllers on the ground.

The International Space Station is getting ready to deploy another satellite while the Expedition 63 crew winds down the work week on logistics and space science.

Commander Chris Cassidy and Flight Engineer Bob Behnken set up hardware today in Japan’s Kibo laboratory module that will deploy another Red-Eye satellite. The third and final Red-Eye microsatellite will be deployed outside Kibo to test satellite communications, flight computers and thermal management technologies.

Cassidy then joined fellow NASA astronaut Doug Hurley transferring resupply racks from the Permanent Multipurpose Module (PMM) into Japan’s HTV-9 space freighter. Behnken helped out as he moved gear from the PMM into the Unity module to make space for the rack swap work during the afternoon.

Cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin changed out fuel bottles in the Combustion Integrated Rack this morning to continue the safe research of flames in microgravity. Then he moved on observing particle clouds for a plasma crystal study that seeks to increase fundamental knowledge and improve spacecraft designs.

First-time Flight Engineer Ivan Vagner was photographing the Earth today documenting natural and man-made catastrophes. He also sampled the atmosphere in the Russian segment of the station before working on the Zvezda service module’s ventilation system.

Spacesuit Work, Earth and Physics Studies Today

The sun's glint on the Timor Sea
The sun’s glint on the Timor Sea between Indonesia and Australia is mellowed by cloud cover in this photograph from the station.

Two NASA astronauts are getting their spacesuits ready for a pair of spacewalks set to begin next week. The rest of the Expedition 63 crew juggled a variety of space science and life support work aboard the International Space Station today.

NASA astronauts Chris Cassidy and Bob Behnken spent Thursday filtering cooling loops and refilling water tanks inside the U.S. spacesuits they will wear during two maintenance spacewalks. The duo will exit the station’s U.S. Quest airlock on June 26 and July 1 starting at 7:35 a.m. EDT to finalize the long-running power upgrade work.

The experienced spacewalkers, who each have six spacewalks from previous missions, reviewed their complex tasks step-by-step on a computer during the afternoon. Cassidy and Behnken will swap old nickel-hydrogen batteries with new lithium-ion batteries on the Starboard-6 truss structure. NASA TV will begin its live coverage of both spacewalks, planned for about seven hours each, starting at 6 a.m.

Flight Engineers Doug Hurley of NASA and Ivan Vagner of Roscosmos reviewed their support roles for the upcoming spacewalks. They will help the astronauts in and out of their spacesuits and monitor the spacewalks from inside the orbiting lab.

Hurley later serviced samples for a space bubbles study, possibly improving oxygen and medicine delivery systems, while also working on light plumbing tasks after lunchtime. Vagner checked out communications gear, had an Earth photography session and worked on a Russian oxygen generator.

Veteran cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin also spent some time photographing the Earth to help scientists forecast natural and man-made catastrophes. He then continued more plasma crystal research to gain fundamental knowledge and improve spacecraft designs.

Dragon Work, Space Research and Spacewalk Preps Today

Expedition 63 Commander Chris Cassidy prepares to stow biological samples for preservation inside a science freezer.
Expedition 63 Commander Chris Cassidy prepares to stow biological samples for preservation inside a science freezer.

Two NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station are getting ready for a pair of spacewalks set to begin at the end of June. Meanwhile, the Expedition 63 crew is still performing advanced space research to benefit Earth and space industries.

Commander Chris Cassidy and Flight Engineer Bob Behnken are studying the tasks they will perform during two spacewalks to upgrade station power systems. NASA TV will broadcast both spacewalks live on June 26 and July 1 when the astronauts will swap old nickel-hydrogen batteries with new lithium-ion batteries on the Starboard-6 truss structure.

Flight Engineers Doug Hurley of NASA and Ivan Vagner of Roscosmos teamed up Wednesday morning readying the jetpacks the spacewalkers would use in the unlikely event they became detached from the station. They later joined Cassidy and Behnken during the afternoon for a spacewalk review with engineers on the ground.

Cassidy was back on biology work this morning collecting and stowing his blood and urine samples to learn how microgravity affects the human body. Behnken and Hurley checked their Dragon crew suits and charged their crew ship’s computer tablets.

Vagner also had time for a trio of Russian experiments as he photographed the Earth, researched future spacecraft piloting techniques and studied plasma crystals. Fellow cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin was also studying plasma crystals today while researching the dynamic forces the station experiences in orbit.

The Red-Eye microsatellite was deployed into Earth orbit this afternoon using the NanoRacks Kaber Microsat deployer outside Japan’s Kibo laboratory module. The 110-kilogram Red-Eye will test satellite communications, flight computers and thermal management technologies.

Biology and Physics as Crew Enters BEAM, Preps for Spacewalk

A waning gibbous Moon is pictured just above the Earth's horizon on June 7, 2020.
A waning gibbous Moon is pictured just above the Earth’s horizon on June 7, 2020.

Tuesday’s science aboard the International Space Station encompassed life science, fluids and flames to help humans on Earth and in space. The Expedition 63 crew also configured spacewalk tools and opened up an expandable module.

Commander Chris Cassidy of NASA collected and stowed his blood and urine samples today for later analysis. He also set up an experiment that observes how fluids flow in micrometer-sized tubes to improve medical diagnostic devices on Earth and in spaceships.

Cassidy also joined NASA Flight Engineer Bob Behnken organizing and inspecting a variety of gear ahead of two spacewalks planned for June 26 and July 1. The duo will be swapping old nickel-hydrogen batteries with new lithium-ion batteries on the Starboard-6 truss structure to upgrade the station’s power systems.

Behnken opened up and entered BEAM, the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, to retrieve life support equipment during the afternoon. He also partnered up with fellow Flight Engineer Doug Hurley unpacking new science equipment from Japan’s H-II Transfer Vehicle-9 (HTV-9) resupply ship and installing it in Europe’s Columbus laboratory module.

Veteran cosmonaut Anatoly Ivanishin continued to service the Combustion Integrated Rack replacing fuel bottles to maintain safe fuel and flame research in the device. Insights could improve fire safety as well as combustion processes for Earth and space industries. His Russian colleague Ivan Vagner worked on a pair of Earth observation studies monitoring the effects of catastrophes and the development of forests.

Crew Starts Week With Spacewalk Preps, Satellite Work

Russia's Progress 74 resupply ship
Russia’s Progress 74 resupply ship is pictured docked to the space station as the orbiting lab flew above northern Iraq

The Expedition 63 crew is starting the week getting ready for a pair of upcoming spacewalks and a satellite deployment. The International Space Station residents are also setting up research gear that will analyze hazardous particles and plasma crystals.

The three NASA astronauts onboard the station teamed up today setting up hardware and reviewing plans for two spacewalks planned to start at the end of the month. Commander Chris Cassidy and Flight Engineer Bob Behnken checked out rechargeable batteries that will power up U.S. spacesuit components. Flight Engineer Doug Hurley looked at procedures to put on the spacesuits as well as steps a spacewalker would take during an emergency.

The spacewalks will continue power upgrades begun last year on the outside of the space station. Cassidy and Behnken will replace old nickel-hydrogen batteries with new lithium-ion batteries on the Starboard-6 truss segment. The batteries store and distribute power collected from the solar arrays throughout the station.

Cassidy started Monday in Japan’s Kibo laboratory module readying a 110-kilogram Red-Eye satellite for deployment in the next couple of weeks. He installed the satellite inside Kibo’s airlock where it will be placed into the vacuum of space and ejected into orbit from the NanoRacks Kaber Microsat deployer. Red-Eye, the second of three microsatellites, will test satellite communications, flight computers and thermal management technologies.

Behnken helped out with the Red-Eye work before installing the new Mochii microscope in the Kibo lab where it will analyze particles that could threaten crew health and spacecraft safety. Hurley worked in the European Columbus laboratory module making room for the new European Drawer Rack-2 that will support a variety of new space experiments.

The two cosmonauts in the Russian segment of the station kept up their schedule of microgravity research and life support operations. Veteran Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin serviced hardware that observes plasma crystals which could lead to improved research methods and new spacecraft designs. First time space-flyer Ivan Vagner checked space radiation readings and set up Earth observation hardware.

Crew Gears Up for Spacewalks, Continues Space Science

Astronaut Chris Cassidy is pictured in July of 2013 during a six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk
Expedition 36 Flight Engineer Chris Cassidy is pictured in July 9, 2013, during a six-hour, seven-minute spacewalk at the space station.

Two spacewalks are set to continue upgrading power systems at the International Space Station at the end of the month. The Expedition 63 crew is getting ready for the summer excursions while also researching a variety of space phenomena to benefit Earth and space industries.

Two NASA astronauts will exit the orbital lab on June 26 and July 1 to continue replacing batteries that store and distribute power collected from the solar arrays. They will work on the outer portion of the truss structure, or the Starboard-6 truss, disconnecting and removing the old nickel hydrogen batteries. Following that, new lithium-ion batteries will be installed in their place and powered up by mission controllers on the ground.

The two spacewalkers are following up on the battery swap work that begun last year and continued into January. The complex repair job has been taking place on both the starboard and port sides of the station’s truss structure. That is where the basketball court-sized solar arrays are located. The solar arrays slowly rotate around the truss structure and track the sun but are locked into place during the spacewalks.

Station Commander Chris Cassidy and Flight Engineer Bob Behnken spent the morning resizing U.S. spacesuits before splitting up for a variety of science activities. Cassidy spent the rest of the day configuring the new Spectrum imager that will view the cellular growth of plants in multiple wavelengths. Behnken continued more space bubbles research to promote advanced oxygen and medicine delivery systems.

NASA Flight Engineer Doug Hurley started Thursday on life support maintenance before continuing to unpack Japan’s HTV-9 resupply ship in the afternoon. The two cosmonauts, Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner, spread out in the station’s Russian segment focusing on life support maintenance, window inspections and Earth atmospheric studies.

Station Buzzing With Science in Middle of Spacewalk Preps

A wispy "aurora australis" seemingly intersects with the Earth's airglow
A wispy “aurora australis” seemingly intersects with the Earth’s airglow as the space station orbited above the Indian Ocean halfway between Australia and Antarctica.

The International Space Station is buzzing today with a broad array of research to improve life for humans on and off the Earth. The five-person Expedition 63 crew has also been preparing for a set of spacewalks as the pace of space science ramps up.

The orbital residents are bringing the orbital lab back up to speed to help scientists harness the benefits of space phenomena. Today, the three NASA astronauts and two Roscosmos cosmonauts juggled a variety of experiments encompassing fluids, combustion, genetics and vision among others.

NASA Flight Engineers Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken spent part of the morning continuing to observe how bubbles behave in microfluid systems. Hurley then started another experiment to look at how tanks of various shapes affect fluids and gases. Both studies have the potential to impact future aerospace and medicine technologies.

The duo also worked on U.S. spacesuits ahead of planned spacewalks to continue upgrading power systems on the outside of the space station. They later split up as Behnken worked on a genetic analyzer that can provide results in just a few hours, much faster than previous research methods. At the end of the day, Hurley joined NASA Commander Chris Cassidy for ultrasound eye scans to examine the cornea, lens and optic nerve.

Cassidy spent a portion his day replacing components in the treadmill located in the Tranquility module. He also began setting up the new Spectrum imager that will use multiple wavelengths to view the cellular and tissue growth of botany samples.

Russian Flight Engineer Anatoly Ivanishin replaced laptop computer batteries then swapped fuel bottles inside the Combustion Integrated Rack to continue safe fuel and flame research. Fellow cosmonaut Ivan Vagner unpacked cargo from the Progress 75 resupply ship and set up a cinematic virtual reality camera to film station activities for audiences on Earth.