Live NASA TV Coverage of Expedition 42 Docking Begins

Soyuz and Progress at Night
Night panorama of parts of Europe on Oct. 1, 2014. Kiev, Ukraine is seen near the right edge of the photo in the vertical center. Lights of Constanta, Romania can be seen just below the Russian Progress 56 cargo and the Soyuz TMA-13M docked to the station.

Aboard their Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft, Terry Virts, Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Samantha Cristoforetti are scheduled to dock at 9:53 p.m. EST to the International Space Station’s Rassvet module. NASA Television coverage of the docking will begin at 9:15 p.m. NASA TV will resume at 11 p.m. to cover hatch opening between the two spacecraft and the welcome ceremony.

The Soyuz crew will join Expedition 42 Commander Barry “Butch” Wilmore of NASA and Alexander Samoukutyaev and Elena Serova of the Russian Federal Space Agency. Wilmore, Samoukutyaev and Serova have lived aboard the space station since September.

Watch live starting at 9:15 p.m. on NASA TV: https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Expedition 42 Trio Launches on Time to Station

The Soyuz TMA-15M launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station at 4:01 p.m. EST (3:01 a.m. on Nov. 24 Baikonur time). Terry Virts of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency now are safely in orbit.

Soyuz Launches on Time
The Soyuz TMA-15M launches on time from the Baikonur Cosmodrome at 4:01 p.m. EST. Credit: NASA TV

Virts, Shkaplerov and Cristoforetti will dock with the station’s Rassvet module at 9:53 p.m. Welcoming them aboard will be the current station residents, Expedition 42 Commander Barry “Butch” Wilmore of NASA and Alexander Samoukutyaev and Elena Serova of Roscosmos. Wilmore, Samoukutyaev and Serova arrived at the space station in September aboard their Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft and will remain aboard until March 2015.

Some of the cargo flown aboard this Soyuz will be used in research investigations that are either ongoing or planned aboard the International Space Station. Items such as questionnaires will be delivered to obtain in-flight data about crew member characteristics, such as day-to-day changes in health or incidence of pain or pressure in microgravity. One such investigation is Space Headaches which uses questionnaires to collect information about the prevalence and characteristics of crew members’ headaches in microgravity. This information is used to develop future countermeasures for headaches often caused by intracranial pressure change.

Read more about Space Headaches
Read more about intracranial pressure change

Researchers will also use biological sample kits delivered by the Soyuz spacecraft to obtain samples of blood, saliva or urine. The ongoing collection of biological samples from crew members help scientists determine if immune system impairment caused by spaceflight increases the possibility for infection or poses a significant health risk during life aboard the space station.

Watch NASA TV for Launch of Expedition 42

Soyuz on Launch Pad
The Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft rests at its launch pad with three Expedition 42 crew members inside waiting for a six hour ride to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

The Russian Soyuz spacecraft that will carry three additional crew members to the International Space Station stands ready for its 4:01 p.m. EST liftoff. NASA Television coverage of the launch begins at 3 p.m.

Terry Virts of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency will launch aboard their Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Watch on NASA TV or at: https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

View Timeline of Expedition 42 Launch Activities

Expediiton 42
jsc2014e093608 (19 November 2014)— In the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 42/43 crewmembers Terry Virts of NASA (left), Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (right) answer questions from reporters Nov. 19 during their second and final pre-launch “fit check” dress rehearsal activities.

At the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Terry Virts of NASA, Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency are preparing for their launch to the International Space Station. Their journey to the station will begin with a 4:01 p.m. EST (3:01 a.m. on Nov. 24 Baikonur time) liftoff. NASA TV will broadcast launch coverage live at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv beginning at 3 p.m.

Below is the crew’s launch timeline, from wakeup to docking.

Sunday, Nov. 23

EST Event
6:10 a.m.               Crew wakeup at Cosmonaut Hotel
9:25 a.m.               Crew departs Cosmonaut Hotel
10:10 a.m.             Crew arrives at Site 254
10:16 a.m.             Batteries installed in booster
10:55 a.m.             Crew suit up
11:01 a.m.             Tanking begins
11:55 a.m.             Crew meets family members on other side of the glass
11:56 a.m.             Booster loaded with liquid Oxygen
12:56 p.m.             First and second stage Oxygen fueling complete
12:15 p.m.             Crew walkout and readiness report to the State Commission
1:20 p.m.               Crew departs for launch pad (Site 31)
1:30 p.m.               Crew arrives at launch pad (Site 31)
1:35 p.m.               Crew boards Soyuz; strapped in to the Descent module
2:26 p.m.               Descent module hardware tested
2:41 p.m.               Hatch closed; leak checks begin
3:00 p.m.              NASA TV: LAUNCH COVERAGE BEGINS
3:01 p.m.               Launch vehicle control system prep; gyro activation
3:16 p.m.               Pad service structure components lowered
3:17 p.m.               Clamshell gantry service towers retracted
3:24 p.m.               Suit leak checks begin; descent module testing complete
3:27 p.m.               Emergency escape system armed
3:46 p.m.               Suit leak checks complete; escape system to auto
3:51 p.m.               Gyros in flight readiness and recorders activated
3:54 p.m.               Pre-launch operations complete
3:55 p.m.               Launch countdown operations to auto; vehicle ready
3:56 p.m.               Commander’s controls activated
3:57 p.m.               Combustion chamber nitrogen purge
3:58:14 p.m.          Propellant drainback
3:58:29 p.m.          Booster propellant tank pressurization
3:59:10 p.m.          ISS flies directly over Baikonur Cosmodrome
3:59:44 p.m.          Ground propellant feed terminated
4:00:14 p.m.          Vehicle to internal power
4:00:39 p.m.          First umbilical tower separates, Auto sequence start
4:00:44 p.m.          Ground umbilical to third stage disconnected
4:00:59 p.m.          Second umbilical tower separates
4:01:02 p.m.          Launch command issued, Engine Start Sequence Begins
4:01:04 p.m.          Engine turbopumps at flight speed
4:01:09 p.m.          Engines at maximum thrust
4:01:14 p.m.         LAUNCH OF SOYUZ TMA-15M TO THE ISS
4:09 p.m.               Third Stage Shutdown; Orbital Insertion
9:15 p.m.              NASA TV: DOCKING COVERAGE BEGINS
9:30 p.m.               Flyaround mode start
9:38 p.m.               Station-keeping start
9:42 p.m.               Final Approach start
9:53 p.m.              DOCKING OF SOYUZ TMA-15M TO THE ISS
10:07 p.m.             Soyuz & station hooks closed
11 p.m.                 NASA TV: HATCH OPENING COVERAGE BEGINS
11:30 p.m.             Hatches between Soyuz and station open

To learn more about Expedition 42, visit: http://go.nasa.gov/1yMQKPe.

To follow Twitter updates from NASA’s Expedition 42 astronauts, visit:

http://www.twitter.com/AstroTerry
http://www.twitter.com/AntonAstrey
http://www.twitter.com/AstroSamantha

To join the online conversation about the International Space Station and Expedition 40 on Twitter, follow the hashtags #ISS, #Exp42 and #Soyuz. To learn more about all the ways to connect and collaborate with NASA, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/connect.

Soyuz Preps for Rollout as Station Crew Works Array of Science

Elena Serova
Cosmonaut and Flight Engineer Elena Serova works in the Russian segment of the International Space Station.

A trio of new Expedition 42 crew members is in its final preparations before Sunday’s launch and six-hour ride aboard a Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft to the International Space Station. The rocket with the Soyuz capsule attached will roll out to the launch pad Friday morning at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

› Read about live NASA TV coverage of the Expedition 42 launch

Aboard the orbital laboratory, the current crew members, Commander Barry Wilmore and Flight Engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova, are working their scheduled task list of ongoing science and maintenance.

Wilmore opened the Fluids Integrated Rack to configure a microscope for the ACE-M-3 experiment. The advanced fluids study observes small particles suspended within a liquid that build into 3D structures. During the afternoon, the commander worked on Europe’s Kubik incubator that supports life science with organisms such as seeds, cells and small animals.

› Read more about the Fluids Integrated Rack
› Read more about the ACE-M-3 study
› Read more about Kubik

The orbiting cosmonauts got back together again Thursday working on a Russian chemistry education experiment with Russian school children. The duo also worked throughout the Russian segment checking cables, inspecting panels and conducting preventative maintenance on the ventilation system and oxygen generator.

Botany Studies and Russian Maintenance as Soyuz Launch Nears

Expedition 42/43
jsc2014e093604 (Nov. 19, 2014) — In the Integration Facility at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Expedition 42/43 crewmembers Terry Virts of NASA (left), Anton Shkaplerov of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (right) pose for pictures Nov. 19 in front of their Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Viktor Ivanov.

Commander Barry Wilmore worked in the Japanese Kibo lab module on the Aniso Tubule botany experiment that studies how roots adapt to gravity. After lunch, Wilmore went back to more hardware replacement work on the Combustion Integrated Rack that he began Tuesday. At the end of the day he configured a maintenance work area for upcoming operations of another botany study, the Seedling Growth experiment.

Read more about the botany studies… › Aniso Tubule, › Seedling Growth
› Read more about the Combustion Integrated Rack

Flight Engineer Alexander Samokutyaev worked in the Russian segment venting gas from an air conditioner. He was assisted by his fellow cosmonaut Elena Serova who also installed gas analyzer hardware and cleaned vents. The duo partnered up later in the day for a new chemistry education experiment with participation from Russian school children.

The next Expedition 42 trio waiting to join the International Space Station crew conducted final Sokol launch and entry suit fit checks at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. NASA astronaut Terry Virts, Roscosmos cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov and European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti are making final preparations before Sunday’s launch at 4:01 p.m. EST to the space station aboard the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft.

› Read about live NASA TV coverage of the Expedition 42 launch

Terry Virts
jsc2014e093607 (Nov. 19, 2014) — Terry Virts of NASA poses for a picture Nov. 19 by the Soyuz booster that will send the Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft into orbit. Credit: NASA/Viktor Ivanov

Routine Maintenance on Station While Ground Crew Relaxes

Wilmore works on CIR
Barry Wilmore opened up the Combustion Integrated Rack and pulled out gear to replace hardware on the fiery experiment device. Credit: NASA TV

Commander Barry Wilmore worked throughout the day Tuesday in the Destiny laboratory’s Combustion Integrated Rack replacing hardware that fuels experiments. Afterward, he drained a waste water tank in the Tranquility node then moved on to a Health Maintenance System test.

› Read more about the Combustion Integrated Rack

Flight Engineer Alexander Samokutyaev replaced a battery module in the Zvezda service module then repaired and photographed an air duct. His fellow cosmonaut, Elena Serova, checked Russian sensors that monitor air pressure then proceeded with disinfectant work to prevent microbial growth in the Zarya module.

A new trio of Expedition 42 crew members is relaxing at the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Kazakhstan. Soyuz Commander Anton Shkaplerov and Flight Engineers Terry Virts and Samantha Cristoforetti played games, had medical checks and planted trees during a traditional ceremony Tuesday.

Their Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft is being readied for its roll out to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Friday. The new crew will launch aboard the Soyuz on Sunday for a near six-hour ride to the International Space Station’s Rassvet module.

› Read about live NASA TV coverage of the Expedition 42 launch

3D Printer Installed as Station Preps for New Trio

Wilmore Installs 3D Printer
Commander Barry WIlmore works on Monday to install a 3D printer inside the Destiny laboratory’s Microgravity Science Glovebox. Credit: NASA TV

Commander Barry Wilmore worked throughout Monday to install a 3D printer to get the International Space Station and future crews ready for self-sufficiency. Wilmore will work to calibrate the printer and set up a demonstration of the additive manufacturing technology.

› Read about 3D Printing In Zero-G

His fellow crew members, Flight Engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova, worked on routine maintenance tasks and cargo transfers in the station’s Russian segment. They also paired up for a cardiovascular exam on an exercise bike, sampled the station’s atmosphere and tested television downlink signals.

The next trio to join Expedition 42 is in Kazakhstan counting down to a Nov. 23 launch aboard a Soyuz TMA-15M spacecraft. They are set for a near six-hour ride to the International Space Station where they will live and work until May 2015.

Soyuz TMA-15M Launch Schedule
NASA TV will provide live televised coverage of the launch of Expedition 42 on Nov. 23 at 3:01 p.m. CST. Credit: NASA TV

Expedition 41 Lands Safely in Kazakhstan

Soyuz Landing
The Soyuz TMA-13M carrying the Expedition 41 trio fires its soft-landing engines right on time at 10:58 p.m. EST.

Expedition 41 Flight Engineers Reid Wiseman of NASA, Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) landed their Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft in Kazakhstan at 10:58 p.m. EST. The trio arrived at the International Space Station on May 29, and spent more than five months conducting research and maintenance activites.

Russian recovery teams will help the crew exit the Soyuz vehicle and adjust to gravity after their stay in space. Wiseman, Gerst and Suraev spent 165 days aboard the space station and clocked more than 70 million miles during their time in space.

This was the first mission for both Wiseman and Gerst. Suraev now has spent 334 days in space during two missions, including Expeditions 21 and 22.

The station now is occupied by Expedition 42 Commander Barry “Butch” Wilmore of NASA and Flight Engineers Alexander Samokutyaev and Elena Serova of Roscosmos. They will remain aboard the station to continue research and maintenance until the remainder of the Expedition 42 crew arrives later this month. NASA astronaut Terry Virts, Russian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov and ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti are scheduled to launch from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Nov. 23, (U.S. time).

Expedition 41 Lands
Screens at the Mission Control Center in Russia signify a safe landing for the Expedition 41 trio inside the Soyuz TMA-13M spacecraft. Credit: NASA TV

Soyuz Completes Deorbit Burn, Expedition 41 Headed Home

Expedition 41 crew members Reid Wiseman of NASA, Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency and Soyuz Commander Maxim Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), are headed back to Earth following the 4-minute, 41-second Soyuz TMA-13M deorbit burn completed at 10:09 p.m. EST.

The three sections of the Soyuz spacecraft will pyrotechnically separate at 10:32 p.m., atmospheric entry interface occurs at 10:35 p.m., parachutes will open at 10:44 p.m. and landing is targeted for 10:58 p.m. northeast of Arkalyk, Kazakhstan.

NASA will continue broadcasting on all its television channels and online at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv until the crew members are safely removed from the Soyuz.