Astronauts Look Ahead to Next Cygnus Cargo Mission

Astronauts Kimiya Yui and Kjell Lindgren
Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui (left) and NASA astronaut Kjell Lindgren celebrated 100 days in space on Oct. 30.

A trio of astronauts are still cleaning up after last week’s spacewalk outside the International Space Station. The cosmonauts are working on their suite of advanced space science and maintenance tasks. Also, the crew is preparing for the launch of the next Orbital ATK commercial cargo mission targeted for Dec. 3.

Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui joined NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren for the post-spacewalk cleanup work in the U.S. Quest airlock. The team stowed their spacewalk tools and hardware and scrubbed cooling loops in the U.S. spacesuits.

Kelly and Yui also partnered together to ready the station for the arrival of the Orbital ATK Cygnus cargo craft. The duo reviewed installation procedures for the Nitrogen Oxygen Recharge System scheduled to be delivered aboard the Cygnus.

In the Russian segment of the station, three veteran cosmonauts were busy researching a wide variety of subjects and working on Russian station systems. Oleg Kononenko looked at how microgravity affects a crew member’s spacecraft piloting skills. Sergey Volkov explored how vibrations on the station affect experiment results. One-Year crew member Mikhail Kornienko stowed gear inside an outgoing Progress craft for disposal.

Spacewalkers Relax Monday as Cosmonauts Explore Science

The Expedition 45 Crew
The Expedition 45 crew gathers inside the Destiny laboratory to celebrate the 15th anniversary of continuous human presence aboard the International Space Station.

NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren cleaned up the International Space Station’s Quest airlock over the weekend after completing two spacewalks over nine days. The rest of the Expedition 45 crew started the work week with a series of ongoing science experiments to improve life on Earth and for future crews.

One-Year crew member Mikhail Kornienko explored his fine motor skills and studied cardiac bioelectric activity at rest. Cosmonaut Sergey Volkov researched remotely controlling a rover on Earth from the station and worked with fellow cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko on maintenance inside the Zvezda service module. Kononenko also researched the electromagnetic state of the space station and the Earth’s ionosphere.

Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui who assisted Kelly and Lindgren during their two spacewalks took some time off and relaxed Monday with the duo. However, the trio had their daily workouts and collected blood samples for stowage in a science freezer. Kelly also joined Kornienko for interviews with ABC’s “The View” and ITV News.

Pair of NASA Astronauts Wrap Up Second Spacewalk

Astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren
Astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren translate along the port truss structure back to the Quest airlock after completing cooling system servicing work. Credit: NASA TV

NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren ended their spacewalk at 2:10 p.m. EST with the repressurization of the U.S. Quest airlock. The astronauts restored the port truss (P6) ammonia cooling system to its original configuration, the main task for today’s spacewalk. They also returned ammonia to the desired levels in both the prime and back-up systems.

In a minor departure from the planned tasks, the astronauts ran out of time to cinch and cover a spare radiator known as the Trailing Thermal Control Radiator. The radiator, which Lindgren retracted earlier in the spacewalk, was fully redeployed and locked into place in a dormant state.

The radiator had been deployed during a November 2012 spacewalk by astronauts Sunita Williams and Aki Hoshide as they tried to isolate a leak in the truss’ cooling supply by re-plumbing the system to the backup radiator. The leak persisted and was subsequently traced to a different component that was replaced during a spacewalk in May 2013.

The 7 hour and 48 minute spacewalk was the second for both astronauts, and the 190th in support of assembly and maintenance of the orbiting laboratory. Crew members have now spent a total of 1,192 hours and 4 minutes working outside the orbital laboratory.

Stay up-to-date on the latest ISS news at: www.nasa.gov/station

Spacewalkers Moving Ahead With Cooling System Work

Spacewalker Scott Kelly
Spacewalker Scott Kelly works on cables in the P6 truss structure to restore its cooling system back to its original configuration. Credit: NASA TV

Approximately 3.5 hours into today’s spacewalk, astronauts Kjell Lindgren and Scott Kelly have completed the first of several steps to restore the port truss (P6) ammonia cooling system to its original configuration.

Kelly and Lindgren have returned ammonia to the desired levels in both the prime and back-up systems.

Watch the spacewalk on NASA Television at: https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Follow @Space_Station and #spacewalk on Twitter to join the conversation online.

Astronauts Begin Second Spacewalk to Finish Cooling System Repairs

Station, Earth and Milky Way
Astronaut Scott Kelly posted this photo to Twitter on August 9, 2015 with the caption, “Day 135. #MilkyWay. You’re old, dusty, gassy and warped. But beautiful. Good night from @space_station! #YearInSpace”.

NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren switched their spacesuits to battery power at 6:22 a.m. EST, signifying the start of today’s spacewalk, planned for 6 hours and 30 minutes.

Lindgren is wearing a spacesuit with red stripes and is designated EV1. His helmet camera displays the number 17. Kelly is wearing a spacesuit with no stripes and is designated EV2. His helmet camera displays the number 18.

The astronauts are embarking on the 190th spacewalk in support of space station assembly and maintenance to restore the port truss ammonia cooling system to its original configuration following a leak detection exercise three years ago that ultimately resulted in the replacement of an ammonia pump on the station’s truss.

NASA Television is broadcasting the spacewalk at www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Follow @Space_Station and #spacewalk on Twitter to join the conversation online.

Watch Spacewalkers Complete Repairs Live Today on NASA TV

NASA Astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren
NASA Astronauts Scott Kelly (left) and Kjell Lindgren will conduct a spacewalk today to upgrade and service the International Space Station.

NASA Television is providing live coverage of today’s U.S. spacewalk from the International Space Station. The spacewalk is scheduled to begin at approximately 7:10 a.m. EST, or earlier, if the crew is ready to begin ahead of schedule, and will last about 6 hours and 30 minutes. NASA TV coverage begins at 5:30 a.m.

This is the second spacewalk for both Expedition 45 Commander Scott Kelly and Flight Engineer Kjell Lindgren. They will venture out of the Quest airlock to configure the port truss (P6) ammonia cooling system to its original state. A spacewalk in November 2012 by astronauts Sunita Williams and Aki Hoshide tried to isolate a leak in the truss’ cooling supply by re-plumbing the system to a backup radiator, but the leak persisted and was subsequently traced to a different component that was replaced during a spacewalk in May 2013. Now leak-free, officials decided to restore the port truss cooling system to its primary method of dispelling heat.

The spacewalk is the 190th in support of space station assembly and maintenance and the second in nine days for Kelly and Lindgren.

Watch the spacewalk live at www.nasa.gov/nasatv.

Follow @Space_Station and #spacewalk on Twitter to join the conversation online.

Spacewalkers Get Tools Ready While Conducting Research

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly
NASA astronaut Scott Kelly snaps a quick space selfie during his first ever spacewalk on Oct 28, 2015.

Two NASA astronauts are getting ready for their second spacewalk Friday morning while also conducting science. The rest of the global crew worked on orbital lab maintenance and continued international space research.

Expedition 45 Commander Scott Kelly and Flight Engineer Kjell Lindgren organized their spacewalk tools today and attached checklists to their spacesuit cuffs. Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui, who will coordinate Friday’s spacewalk from inside the International Space Station, assisted Kelly and Lindgren with their tool checks.

The three astronauts also had time today for some science work to improve life on Earth and for future crews.

Lindgren downloaded data captured from tiny free-flying satellites known as SPHERES that test autonomous rendezvous and docking maneuvers and other flight techniques. Yui worked on the Capillary Flow Experiment with results potentially benefiting fluid systems on future spacecraft. Finally, Kelly took a test to measure his cognitive adaptation during his year-long spaceflight.

Astronauts Getting Ready for Friday Spacewalk

NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly
NASA astronaut Scott Kelly is photographed just outside the airlock during his first ever spacewalk on Oct 28, 2015.

NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren are looking ahead to Friday morning’s spacewalk to return the port truss cooling system back to its original configuration after repair work completed in 2012. Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui will assist the spacewalkers before they get out the door and coordinate their activities from inside the International Space Station.

Today, the trio reviewed the cooling system servicing spacewalk procedures and organized their tools. Kelly and Lindgren will work with ammonia fluid cables and tanks during the spacewalk scheduled for Friday at 7:10 a.m. EST. Yui joined the duo and trained for the possibility their spacesuits may come in contact with ammonia coolant flakes.

Astronauts Set Up for Next Spacewalk as Research Continues

New York City at Night
An Expedition 45 crew member captured this nighttime photograph of New York City.

NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren are now looking ahead to their second spacewalk scheduled for Friday Nov. 6 at 7:10 a.m. EST. They will work outside for six-hours, 30-minutes to return a port truss cooling system to its original configuration after repair work during a previous spacewalk in 2012.

Kelly and Lindgren are inspecting their tethers today which keep spacewalkers attached to the International Space Station. They are also reviewing procedures for the upcoming spacewalk and organizing their tools.

Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui, who is also the spacewalkers’ internal coordinator, worked in the Kibo lab module attaching science samples to an experiment platform. He then moved on to studying how plants grow in space without gravity to guide them.

On the Russian side of the orbital laboratory, the cosmonauts explored tools and acoustic methods to detect micrometeoroid impacts on the station. The veteran trio of Sergey Volkov, Mikhail Kornienko and Oleg Kononenko, also researched the physics of plasma crystals and how a crew member adapts to piloting a spacecraft.

Scott Kelly Breaks NASA Single Spaceflight Record Today

NASA Astronauts Single Spaceflight Record Holders
NASA astronaut Scott Kelly passes Michael Lopez-Alegria for longest single spaceflight on Oct. 29, 2015. Credit: NASA

Expedition 45 Commander Scott Kelly has been in space longer than any other NASA astronaut. Today he exceeds Michael Lopez-Alegria’s record of 215 days on a single spaceflight. He passed Michael Fincke’s record of 382 cumulative days in space on Oct. 16.

Kelly also completed his first spacewalk along with Flight Engineer Kjell Lindgren on Wednesday. The duo worked outside for seven hours and 16 minutes on a series of tasks to service and upgrade the International Space Station. They wrapped a dark matter detection experiment in a thermal blanket, lubricated the tip of the Canadarm2 robotic arm and then routed power and data cables for a future docking port.

Meanwhile, the crew is back at work today on advanced space science and routine laboratory maintenance. Japanese astronaut Kimiya Yui explored how plants grow without gravity to guide them. Kelly recorded his impressions of the space station’s living and working space for the Habitability study. Lindgren trained for the VIABLE experiment that researches microbe development on station surfaces.

The cosmonauts including Sergey Volkov, Mikhail Kornienko and Oleg Kononenko worked on scheduled tasks in the Russian segment of the orbital laboratory. They explored Earth photography techniques, the physics of plasma crystals and controlling a rover on the ground from space.