Weather 90% Favorable for Wednesday’s Launch

Dustin Cammack, NASA Communications, far left, moderates a prelaunch news conference on Dec. 3, 2019, for SpaceX's 19th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission for NASA to the International Space Station, at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Speaking to members fo the news media are, from left, Bryan Dansbury, assistant program scientist, International Space Station Program Science Office at NASA; Jessica Jensen, director, Dragon Mission Management at SpaceX; and Mike McAleenan, launch weather officer, U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing.
Dustin Cammack, NASA Communications, far left, moderates a prelaunch news conference on Dec. 3, 2019, for SpaceX’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission for NASA to the International Space Station, at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Speaking to members fo the news media are, from left, Bryan Dansberry, assistant program scientist, International Space Station Program Science Office at NASA; Jessica Jensen, director, Dragon Mission Management at SpaceX; and Mike McAleenan, launch weather officer, U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, topped with the Dragon spacecraft, is ready for launch at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida for the company’s CRS-19 mission to the International Space Station. Following today’s prelaunch news conference, liftoff remains on track for 12:51 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Dec. 4.

The mission patch for SpaceX's 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.
SpaceX’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Dec. 4, 2019, at 12:51 p.m. EST.

“As of now, we’re tracking no issues on Falcon 9, none on Dragon, and we’re on track with regards to timeline,” said Jessica Jensen, director of Dragon Mission Management at SpaceX.

Weather officials are predicting a 90% chance of favorable weather conditions for launch, with primary concerns revolving around liftoff winds and upper-level winds.

“It’s going to be a beautiful day tomorrow, just a little chilly in the morning, but we’re hoping that we can get through those upper-level winds,” said Mike McAleenan, a launch weather officer with the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Space Wing. “We may see some patchy fog or stratus around, but that will definitely burn off in time for launch, so we should have some pretty good viewing out there.”

Live launch coverage will begin at 12:30 p.m. EST tomorrow, Dec. 4, on NASA TV and the agency’s website, as well as here on the blog. CRS-19 will deliver supplies, equipment and material that will directly support dozens of science and research investigations that will take place during Expeditions 61 and 62.

Also being carried by the Dragon spacecraft is the Japanese government’s Hyperspectral Imager Suite (HISUI), a next-generation, hyperspectral Earth imaging system.

Learn more about the mission at: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spx19-research/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.