SpaceX Gears Up for Second CRS-19 Launch Attempt

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for liftoff at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida on Dec. 5, 2019, for the company’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for liftoff at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida on Dec. 5, 2019, for the company’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. Launch is scheduled for 12:29 p.m. EST. Photo credit: NASA

SpaceX is preparing for the second launch attempt of its 19th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission to the International Space Station today at 12:29 p.m. EST. The company’s Falcon 9 rocket and uncrewed Dragon spacecraft will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

SpaceX made the decision to call off the first launch attempt yesterday due to upper-altitude winds and high winds at sea, creating dangerous conditions around the drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You,” which the rocket’s first stage will attempt landing on following its separation from the rest of the launch vehicle.

Meteorologists with the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing are predicting an 90% chance of favorable weather conditions for today’s launch. Join us here on the blog, as well as on NASA TV and the agency’s website, for live launch countdown coverage, beginning at 12 p.m. EST.

The Dragon spacecraft that will deliver critical supplies, equipment and material to the space station on this mission first flew to the orbiting laboratory in 2014 on CRS-4, and then again on CRS-11, making it the first spacecraft that SpaceX reused for resupply missions. Now preparing to fly for a third time, the material it will carry on CRS-19 will directly support dozens of research investigations taking place in space. To learn more about some of those research experiments, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spx19-research/

CRS-19 Launch Scrubbed Due to Winds

This afternoon’s launch attempt has been scrubbed due to winds. The next launch opportunity will be at 12:29 p.m. EST on Thursday, Dec. 5. Launch coverage for the SpaceX CRS-19 mission to the International Space Station will begin at 12 p.m. EST on NASA Television and the agency’s website. A launch of the SpaceX cargo Dragon spacecraft on Thursday will result in its arrival at the space station on Sunday, Dec. 8.

Launch Day Arrives for SpaceX’s 19th Resupply Services Mission to Station

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for liftoff at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida on Dec. 4, 2019, for the company’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for liftoff at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida on Dec. 4, 2019, for the company’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. Launch is scheduled for 12:51 p.m. EST. Photo credit: NASA

SpaceX’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission is set to launch at 12:51 p.m. EST today from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The company’s uncrewed Dragon spacecraft – launching aboard a Falcon 9 rocket – will deliver research, supplies and equipment to the International Space Station.

Weather officials continue to predict a 90% chance of favorable weather conditions for launch. Beginning at 12:30 p.m., join us here on the blog for live coverage, and follow along on NASA TV or the agency’s website for the live launch broadcast.

Here’s a look at today’s countdown and ascent milestones. All times are approximate:

COUNTDOWN
Hour/Min/Sec – Events
-00:38:00 – SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for propellant load
-00:35:00 – RP-1 (rocket-grade kerosene) loading begins
-00:35:00 – 1st stage LOX (liquid oxygen) loading begins
-00:16:00 – 2nd stage LOX loading begins
-00:07:58 – Dragon transitions to internal power
-00:01:00 – Command flight computer to begin final prelaunch checks
-00:01:00 – Propellant tanks pressurize for flight
-00:00:45 – SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for launch
-00:00:03 – Engine controller commands engine ignition sequence to start
-00:00:00 – Falcon 9 liftoff

LAUNCH, LANDING AND DRAGON DEPLOYMENT
Hour/Min/Sec – Event
00:01:18 – Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
00:02:31 – 1st stage main engine cutoff (MECO)
00:02:34 – 1st and 2nd stages separate
00:02:42 – 2nd stage engine starts
00:02:47 – 1st stage boostback burn begins
00:06:11 – 1st stage entry burn begins
00:07:48 – 1st stage landing
00:08:35 – 2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:09:35 – Dragon separates from 2nd stage
00:12:02 – Dragon’s solar arrays deploy
02:19:00 – Dragon’s Guidance, Navigation and Control bay door opens

Weather 90% Favorable for Wednesday’s Launch

Dustin Cammack, NASA Communications, far left, moderates a prelaunch news conference on Dec. 3, 2019, for SpaceX's 19th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission for NASA to the International Space Station, at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Speaking to members fo the news media are, from left, Bryan Dansbury, assistant program scientist, International Space Station Program Science Office at NASA; Jessica Jensen, director, Dragon Mission Management at SpaceX; and Mike McAleenan, launch weather officer, U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing.
Dustin Cammack, NASA Communications, far left, moderates a prelaunch news conference on Dec. 3, 2019, for SpaceX’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission for NASA to the International Space Station, at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Speaking to members fo the news media are, from left, Bryan Dansberry, assistant program scientist, International Space Station Program Science Office at NASA; Jessica Jensen, director, Dragon Mission Management at SpaceX; and Mike McAleenan, launch weather officer, U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, topped with the Dragon spacecraft, is ready for launch at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida for the company’s CRS-19 mission to the International Space Station. Following today’s prelaunch news conference, liftoff remains on track for 12:51 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Dec. 4.

The mission patch for SpaceX's 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.
SpaceX’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station is scheduled to lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Dec. 4, 2019, at 12:51 p.m. EST.

“As of now, we’re tracking no issues on Falcon 9, none on Dragon, and we’re on track with regards to timeline,” said Jessica Jensen, director of Dragon Mission Management at SpaceX.

Weather officials are predicting a 90% chance of favorable weather conditions for launch, with primary concerns revolving around liftoff winds and upper-level winds.

“It’s going to be a beautiful day tomorrow, just a little chilly in the morning, but we’re hoping that we can get through those upper-level winds,” said Mike McAleenan, a launch weather officer with the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Space Wing. “We may see some patchy fog or stratus around, but that will definitely burn off in time for launch, so we should have some pretty good viewing out there.”

Live launch coverage will begin at 12:30 p.m. EST tomorrow, Dec. 4, on NASA TV and the agency’s website, as well as here on the blog. CRS-19 will deliver supplies, equipment and material that will directly support dozens of science and research investigations that will take place during Expeditions 61 and 62.

Also being carried by the Dragon spacecraft is the Japanese government’s Hyperspectral Imager Suite (HISUI), a next-generation, hyperspectral Earth imaging system.

Learn more about the mission at: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spx19-research/

Tune in to SpaceX CRS-19 Prelaunch News Conference

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:01 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2019, carrying the Dragon spacecraft on the company's 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:01 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2019, carrying the Dragon spacecraft on the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Kenny Allen

Tune in to NASA TV and the agency’s website at 1:30 p.m. EST today to watch the NASA Social What’s on Board science briefing, highlighting some of the research that will take place on CRS-19, airing from the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Then, stay tuned for the prelaunch news conference, beginning at 4 p.m., and hear from officials with the International Space Station Program Science Office, SpaceX and the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing.

Launch of SpaceX’s 19th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-19) mission to the International Space Station is scheduled for Wednesday, Dec. 4, at 12:51 p.m. EST. The company’s Falcon 9 rocket will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, carrying the Dragon spacecraft that will deliver supplies, equipment and material to the space station. Dragon is slated to arrive at the station on Dec. 7 and will be captured by Expedition 61 crewmembers. Following capture, ground controllers will take over to install the spacecraft to the Harmony module’s Earth-facing port.

Learn more about some of the research and experiments taking place on CRS-19 at: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spx19-research

SpaceX Targeting Wednesday, Dec. 4, for CRS-19 Launch

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soars upward after its liftoff from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:01 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2019, carrying the Dragon spacecraft on the company's 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soars upward after its liftoff from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:01 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2019, carrying the Dragon spacecraft on the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston

NASA’s commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting 12:51 p.m. EST on Wednesday, Dec. 4, for the launch of its 19th resupply mission to the International Space Station. The uncrewed Dragon spacecraft will lift off atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Meteorologists with the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing predict a 90% chance of favorable weather conditions for launch, with the primary concern being wind at the time of liftoff.

The Dragon is filled with supplies and materials that will directly support dozens of science and research investigations aboard the orbiting laboratory. It also will carry the Japanese government’s Hyperspectral Imager Suite (HISUI), a next-generation, hyperspectral Earth imaging system.

Follow live coverage of the CRS-19 mission and prelaunch events here on the blog, NASA TV and the agency’s website:

  • 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3 – NASA Social, What’s on Board science briefing highlighting research taking place on CRS-19
  • 4 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 3 – Prelaunch news conference from Kennedy with representatives from the International Space Station Program Science Office, SpaceX and the U.S. Air Force 45th Space Wing
  • 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4 – Launch countdown coverage begins

Learn more about station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Cargo Dragon Berthed to Station

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:01 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2019, carrying the Dragon spacecraft on the company's 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:01 p.m. EDT on July 25, 2019, carrying the Dragon spacecraft on the company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Kenny Allen

Two days after its launch from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, SpaceX’s Cargo Dragon spacecraft was captured by NASA astronauts Nick Hague and Christina Koch at 9:11 a.m. EDT on Saturday, July 27, using the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm. The spacecraft is now installed to the nadir port of the space station’s Harmony module for its month-long stay.

The company’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission delivered around 5,000 pounds of supplies, equipment and material that will directly support multiple science and research investigations taking place during Expedition 60 and beyond.

Remember to follow @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts, to stay up-to-date on station activities. Or, follow along the station blog at: https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/

SpaceX Falcon 9 Successfully Launches CRS-18

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket successfully lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for SpaceX's 18th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida for SpaceX’s 18th Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station on July 25, 2019, at 6:01 p.m. Photo credit: NASA

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket successfully launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida on July 25, 2019, at 6:01 p.m. EDT, carrying the company’s Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station on its 18th Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-18) mission.

“It was a great launch, we were really happy to see the weather clear out the way it did,” said Bill Spetch, deputy manager of the International Space Station Transportation Integration Office at NASA.

Weather was one thing the launch team closely monitored. Originally scheduled to launch July 24, unfavorable weather conditions caused a last-minute scrub. The morning of July 25, the weather looked much the same but cleared up just in time.

After a picture-perfect launch and spacecraft separation, Dragon is now drawing power from its solar arrays as it begins its solo, two-day trip to the orbiting laboratory. This is the first time a Dragon spacecraft will journey to the space station for a third time. To mark this accomplishment, it is outfitted with three noteworthy stickers: two station badges representing the previous resupply missions it has flown (CRS-6 and CRS-13) and the Apollo 50th anniversary logo.

“We are still inspired by all of the Apollo missions and are excited to continue to work with NASA as they continue to explore the universe,” SpaceX Director of Dragon Mission Management Jessica Jensen said in a prelaunch news conference July 24.

CRS-18 will deliver a number of science investigations, supplies and equipment to the orbiting laboratory, including the International Docking Adapter-3 – a new docking adapter that will enable future spacecraft built under NASA’s Commercial Crew Program to autonomously attach to the station.

Tune in to NASA TV and the agency’s website Saturday, July 27, beginning at 8:30 a.m. EDT to watch Dragon rendezvous, grapple and berthing to the station. When it arrives, NASA astronaut Nick Hague will robotically grapple Dragon, with NASA astronaut Christina Koch serving as backup.

After spacecraft capture – scheduled for approximately 10 a.m. – mission control in Houston will send ground commands for the station’s arm to rotate and install it on the bottom of the orbiting laboratory’s Harmony module. Dragon will remain at the space station until Aug. 20, when it will return to Earth with research and return cargo.

Dragon’s Solar Arrays Deploy

Dragon's solar arrays deploy on its journey to the International Space Station July 25, 2019.
Dragon’s solar arrays deploy on its journey to the International Space Station July 25, 2019. Photo credit: NASA

Dragon’s solar arrays have deployed, which will help power the spacecraft for its journey to the International Space Station. Dragon is scheduled to arrive at the space station Saturday, July 27, with coverage on Dragon rendezvous and capture beginning at 8:30 a.m. EDT on NASA TV and the agency’s website.

At the time of capture, scheduled for 10 a.m., the orbiting laboratory will be flying 254 miles over southeast Russia, north of Mongolia.