CRS-23 Launch from Kennedy Space Center Just Moments Away!

In just a few minutes, the company’s Dragon spacecraft – carrying several important NASA investigations – will blast off aboard a Falcon 9 rocket from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Pad 39A. The instantaneous launch window opens at 3:14 a.m. EDT.

The destination is the International Space Station, where it will dock for approximately one month. Dragon’s planned arrival is Monday, Aug. 30, at about 11 a.m., followed by docking about 90 minutes later. NASA astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur will monitor operations while the spacecraft autonomously docks to the orbiting laboratory’s Harmony module.

SpaceX’s 23rd Cargo Resupply Mission Nears Liftoff

In just under 15 minutes, the Falcon 9 rocket’s nine Merlin engines will roar to life, sending the uncrewed Dragon spacecraft on its journey to the International Space Station for SpaceX’s 23rd commercial resupply services mission. The rocket has been fueled with liquid oxygen and RP-1 – rocket-grade kerosene.

CRS-23 mission patchIn the next few minutes, the Falcon 9’s engines will begin to chill in preparation for launch. At five minutes before launch, Dragon will transition to internal power. Shortly afterward, the command flight computer will begin its final pre-launch checks. At about T-45 seconds, the SpaceX launch director will verify “go” for launch.

Liftoff is targeted for 3:14 a.m. EDT.

Dragon will deliver critical materials that will support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur during Expeditions 65 and 66. To learn more about station activities, follow @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Key Milestones for Today’s Launch

CRS-23 mission Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft
An instantaneous window for today’s CRS-23 launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida opens at approximately 3:14 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA

Packed with more than 4,800 pounds of research, crew supplies and hardware, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida today at 3:14 a.m.

Here is a look at some key milestones:

Mission Timeline (all times approximate)
COUNTDOWN
Hour/Min/Sec      Events
– 00:38:00             SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for propellant load
– 00:35:00             RP-1 (rocket grade kerosene) loading begins
– 00:35:00             1st stage LOX (liquid oxygen) loading begins
– 00:16:00             2nd stage LOX loading begins
– 00:07:00             Falcon 9 begins pre-launch engine chill
– 00:05:00             Dragon transitions to internal power
– 00:01:00             Command flight computer to begin final prelaunch checks
– 00:01:00             Propellant tanks pressurize for flight
– 00:00:45             SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for launch
– 00:00:03             Engine controller commands ignition sequence to start
– 00:00:00             Falcon 9 liftoff

LAUNCH AND DRAGON DEPLOYMENT
Hour/Min/Sec      Events
– 00:01:12               Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
– 00:02:27               1st stage main engine cutoff (MECO)
– 00:02:30               1st and 2nd stages separate
– 00:02:38               2nd stage engine starts
– 00:05:49               1st stage entry burn begins
– 00:07:38               1st stage landing
– 00:08:34               2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
– 00:11:45               Dragon separates from 2nd stage

Follow launch activities at the mission blog and @NASAKennedy and learn more about space station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Live Launch Coverage Begins From Florida’s Space Coast

CRS-23 mission
Tune in to NASA TV or the agency’s website to watch the live broadcast of SpaceX’s 23rd commercial resupply services mission launch from the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

We are now about 20 minutes away from liftoff of SpaceX’s 23rd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Tune in to NASA TV or the agency’s website, starting now, to watch the broadcast live from the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Also, you can stay with us here on the blog, as we bring you live coverage of today’s mission. An instantaneous window opens at approximately 3:14 a.m. EDT. SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket, with the company’s Dragon spacecraft atop, will lift off from Kennedy’s Launch Complex 39A, carrying several important NASA investigations.

But there is more than science packed into the spacecraft. Astronauts aboard the space station will be receiving fresh food, including lemons, onions, cherry tomatoes, avocados, and – always a crew favorite – ice cream.

Dragon is scheduled to arrive at the orbiting laboratory at approximately 11 a.m. on Monday, Aug. 30. It will join the Crew-2 Dragon spacecraft that carried NASA astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur, JAXA astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, and ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet to the space station on April 24.

Stay tuned as we keep you posted on the latest developments of today’s launch.

23rd Commercial Resupply Services Mission: A Look at the Science

When SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket roars off the launch pad from Kennedy Space Center in about 45 minutes, the Dragon spacecraft, set atop the launch vehicle, will be carrying a variety of important of NASA investigations. Here is a look at some of the important science aboard Dragon:

  • CRS-23 mission patchAn experiment to test an implantable, remote-controlled drug delivery system that will utilize a new research facility aboard the orbiting laboratory
  • An investigation that will determine if metabolites from grape skins and seeds used in wine making could help prevent and treat osteoporosis
  • A new robotic arm that could reveal potential uses on Earth, including in disaster relief
  • Several Girl Scouts’ experiments that will study plants, ants, and brine shrimp in microgravity

About 12 minutes after launch of SpaceX’s 23rd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station, Dragon will separate from the Falcon 9 rocket’s second stage and begin a carefully choreographed series of thruster firings to reach the space station. Arrival to the station is planned for Monday, Aug. 30, at approximately 11 a.m.

Dragon will dock autonomously to the forward-facing port of the station’s Harmony module, with Expedition 65 Flight Engineers Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur of NASA monitoring operations. The spacecraft is expected to spend about a month attached to the orbiting outpost before it returns to Earth with about 4,200 pounds of research and cargo, splashing down off the coast of Florida.

Visit NASA’s website for more coverage of NASA SpaceX missions.

Weather Looking Up for Today’s Launch From Kennedy Space Center

CRS-23 mission: Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon capsule
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft stand tall at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A early Sunday morning. Credit: NASA

Let’s try this again! Good morning from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft stand ready for liftoff at Kennedy’s Launch Complex 39A. Poor weather in the area caused a scrub of yesterday’s planned 3:37 a.m. EDT launch.

Weather officials with Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron predict a 80% chance of favorable weather conditions for this morning’s 3:14 launch from the Space Coast, with the cumulus cloud rule and flight through precipitation serving as the primary weather concerns.

For today’s liftoff, there is an instantaneous launch window. Live countdown begins at 2:45 a.m. – watch on NASA TV or the agency’s website. Also, you can stay right here for live coverage, through spacecraft separation.

The third flight for SpaceX under NASA’s second commercial resupply services contract, and the company’s 23rd overall cargo resupply mission, this mission will deliver more than 4,800 pounds of science experiments and research, crew supplies, and hardware to the International Space Station.

NASA, SpaceX Now Targeting Sunday, Aug. 29, for CRS-23 Launch

CRS-23 mission -- rocket on launch pad
SpaceX and NASA are now targeting liftoff of SpaceX’s 23rd Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station for Sunday, Aug. 29, at 3:14 a.m. Credit: NASA

Due to poor weather conditions in the area for today’s planned launch of SpaceX’s 23rd Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station, SpaceX and NASA are now targeting liftoff on Sunday, Aug. 29, at 3:14 a.m. EDT. Launch coverage, live from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, will begin Sunday at 2:45 a.m. on NASA TV, the agency’s website, and the NASA app.

A launch Sunday would lead to docking Monday, Aug. 30, for the Dragon to deliver important research, crew supplies and hardware to the crew aboard the orbiting laboratory. Docking coverage will begin at 9:30 a.m., with the spacecraft planned to arrive at the space station around 11 a.m.

Follow launch activities at the mission blog and @NASAKennedy, and learn more about space station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Weather 40% for This Morning’s Launch From Kennedy Space Center

Weather officials with Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron predict a 40% chance of favorable weather conditions for this morning’s launch from the Space Coast, with the cumulus cloud rule and flight through precipitation serving as the primary weather concerns.

CRS-23 mission patchNASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting 3:37 a.m. EDT, to launch its 23rd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Liftoff will be from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft will deliver new science investigations, supplies, and equipment for the international crew.

Upon Dragon’s arrival – slated for Sunday, Aug. 29, at approximately 11 a.m. – NASA astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur will monitor operations while the spacecraft autonomously docks to the orbiting laboratory’s Harmony module.

Welcome to Launch Day Coverage of SpaceX’s 23rd Resupply Services Mission

CRS-23 mission -- Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon on launch pad
NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting today at 3:37 a.m. EDT to launch its 23rd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA

Hello, and good morning from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida! A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft stand ready for liftoff at Kennedy’s Launch Complex 39A.

Today’s launch is targeted for 3:37 a.m. EDT, less than an hour away. It is an instantaneous launch window. Live countdown begins at 3:15 a.m. – watch on NASA TV or the agency’s website. Also, you can stay right here for live coverage, through spacecraft separation.

The third flight for SpaceX under NASA’s second Commercial Resupply Services Contract, and the company’s 23rd overall cargo resupply mission, this mission will deliver more than 4,800 pounds of science experiments and research, crew supplies, and hardware to the International Space Station.

Here’s a look at some of today’s countdown and ascent milestones. All times are approximate:

COUNTDOWN
Hr/Min/Sec         Event
– 00:38:00             SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for propellant load
– 00:35:00             RP-1 (rocket grade kerosene) loading begins
– 00:35:00             1st stage LOX (liquid oxygen) loading begins
– 00:16:00             2nd stage LOX loading begins
– 00:07:00             Falcon 9 begins pre-launch engine chill
– 00:05:00             Dragon transitions to internal power
– 00:01:00             Command flight computer to begin final prelaunch checks
– 00:01:00             Propellant tanks pressurize for flight
– 00:00:45             SpaceX Launch Director verifies go for launch
– 00:00:03             Engine controller commands ignition sequence to start
– 00:00:00             Falcon 9 liftoff

 LAUNCH, LANDING, AND DRAGON DEPLOYMENT
Hr/Min/Sec        Event
00:01:18               Max Q (moment of peak mechanical stress on the rocket)
00:02:30              1st stage main engine cutoff (MECO)
00:02:34              1st and 2nd stages separate
00:02:41              2nd stage engine starts
00:06:37              1st stage entry burn begins
00:08:38              2nd stage engine cutoff (SECO)
00:08:38              1st stage landing
00:11:49               Dragon separates from 2nd stage
00:12:35               Dragon nosecone open sequence begins

Now, let’s keep our fingers crossed for the weather! That report will be posted here shortly.

Prelaunch News Conference Set for Noon Today

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft for 23rd commercial resupply services mission
NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting Saturday, Aug. 28, to launch its 23rd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Credit: SpaceX

At noon today, NASA TV will broadcast a prelaunch news conference from the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for SpaceX’s 23rd commercial resupply services mission. The event will feature representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program, SpaceX, and the U.S. Space Force Space Launch Delta 45.

Participants include: Joel Montalbano, manager for the International Space Station Program (remotely from Johnson Space Center in Houston); Jennifer Scott Williams, manager, Applications Client Support Office for the International Space Station Program; Sarah Walker, director, Dragon mission management at SpaceX; and Brian Cizek, launch weather officer, 45th Weather Squadron, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

The public can ask questions by using #AskNASA on Twitter. Submitted questions may be answered in real-time during the segment. Immediately following the news conference, NASA TV will air a “What’s on Board” video that will introduce the public to some of the investigators flying science on this mission.

NASA and SpaceX are targeting tomorrow, Aug. 28, at 3:37 a.m. EDT, to launch SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft to the space station. Liftoff, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, will be from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy.

Dragon will deliver new science investigations, supplies, and equipment for the international crew. Live coverage, starting Saturday at 3:15 a.m. EDT, will air on NASA TV, the NASA app and the agency’s website.