Author Archives: Heather S Deiss

NASA Education Express Message — Jan. 12, 2017

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Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 17, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Virtual Visit — Meet Dr. Roosevelt Johnson
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 26, 2017, at 3 p.m. EST

Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night
Audience: Educators of Grades 4-12
Application Deadline: April 14, 2017
Institute Dates: June 26-30, 2017

New Storybook From Elementary GLOBE: ‘What in the World Is Happening to Our Climate?’
Audience: Formal, Informal and Homeschool Educators of Grades K-4


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-12
Event Date: Jan. 12, 2017

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Jan. 12, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research
Audience: Researchers at Academic Institutions in Developing Countries
Application Deadline: Jan. 13, 2017

Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades K-8
Event Date: Jan. 14, 2017, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. PST

Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST

2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition
Audience: Higher Education Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: Jan. 19, 2017

Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers
Audience: Researchers Who Have Received a Ph.D. in the Last Eight Years
Notice of Intent Deadline: Jan. 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: March 17, 2017

Educator Workshop: Utilizing Renewable Energy
Audience: Pre-service Educators and Educators of Grades 9-12
Event Date: Jan. 21, 2017, 10 a.m. – Noon PST

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Jan. 25, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST

Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge
Audience: Educators and Students Ages 5 to 19
Entry Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017

U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Summer Internship Program
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 25, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST

Free Educator Professional Development Workshops From NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Jan. 26, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Workshop Location: Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi

2017 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

Center for Retirement Research’s Steven H. Sandell Grant Program
Audience: Scholars in the Field of Retirement Research and Policy
Proposal Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

Center for Retirement Research’s Dissertation Fellowship Program
Audience: Doctoral Candidates
Application Deadline: Jan. 31, 2017

NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

NASA History Program Office Internships — Summer 2017
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017

2017 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge
Audience: 9-12 and Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline for U.S. Teams: Feb. 1, 2017

2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Notice of Intent Deadline: Feb. 1, 2017
Proposal Deadline: June 1, 2017

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Aeronautics — Come Fly With Us: Smart Skies
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Jan. 17, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will learn about resources that use air traffic control to teach “distance equals rate-times-time” problems. The activities discussed in this webinar address Common Core Mathematics Standards — Operations and Algebraic Thinking. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/217660

Teaching Gravity With NASA
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Jan. 18, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
Participants will receive an overview of resources for teaching about gravity and microgravity to students in 5-8. Discussion will include modifications of activities and accommodations. Activities discussed in this webinar address the Next Generation Science Standards PS2 and PS3. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/217658

Aeronautics — Come Fly With Us: How High Is It?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: Jan. 19, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Explore the NASA “How High Is It?” lesson guide and additional online resources that create scale models of our atmosphere. Models include the layers of Earth’s atmosphere and altitudes of NASA aircraft, spacecraft, and natural and artificial satellites. Develop number sense by representing scale factors in terms of ratios, decimals, and percentages. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/219461

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Virtual Visit — Meet Dr. Roosevelt Johnson

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network at Langley Research Center on Thursday, Jan. 26, 2017, at 3 p.m. EST, for a virtual visit with Dr. Roosevelt Johnson.

Dr. Johnson is NASA’s Deputy Associate Administrator for Education. During his career, Johnson has been a champion and leader of groundbreaking efforts to broaden participation in STEM disciplines. For more than 20 years, he served as a program director for the National Science Foundation working to increase the participation and advancement of underrepresented minorities, women and girls, persons with disabilities, and minority-serving institutions in science and engineering disciplines. He also promoted innovative and transformative STEM education program development at a national level.

Four schools will be chosen to speak with Dr. Johnson about his career path during this live and interactive event. To register your class for the opportunity to speak with Johnson, please complete the registration form at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfXYiccSqutOUkjexmUImov2KtkNfF5VBIWqEQJBU-OmsWtUA/viewform?c=0&w=1.

Schools that are not selected to be a part of the interactive audience will be able to view the webcast event live. A link to the webcast will be posted on the DLN website closer to the event date.

To learn more about Johnson’s career experiences, visit https://www.nasa.gov/offices/education/leadership/johnson_bio.html.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


Summer Institute — Liftoff 2017: Starry Night

Registration is now open for the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, sponsored by NASA’s Texas Space Grant Consortium. This weeklong professional development training for teachers will be held June 26-30, 2017, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. This competitive aerospace workshop emphasizes STEM learning experiences through speakers, hands-on activities and field investigations.

The theme for this year’s institute is “Starry Night.” The event will focus on NASA missions studying our sun and the solar system to unravel mysteries about their origin and evolution. The total solar eclipse of 2017 will be highlighted.

Attendees must be U.S. citizens currently employed as classroom teachers of grades 4-12 with at least one year teaching experience prior to the institute. Texas Space Grant pays all expenses for any selected Texas teacher. Other Space Grant Consortia fund teachers from their states.

Applications are due April 14, 2017.

For more information and to access the online application, visit http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/liftoff/.

If you have questions about the 2017 LiftOff Summer Institute, please email your inquiries to Margaret Baguio at baguio@tsgc.utexas.edu.


New Storybook From Elementary GLOBE: ‘What in the World Is Happening to Our Climate?’

The latest storybook in the Elementary GLOBE series is available online. “What in the World Is Happening to Our Climate?” is a science instructional reader. In this story, the GLOBE kids learn the factors that regulate Earth’s climate. Three new Elementary GLOBE learning activities accompany the story. These materials were developed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research and are supported by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, or NOAA.

The Elementary GLOBE resources introduce K-4 students to the study of Earth system science. All of these resources are free online at http://www.globe.gov/web/elementary-globe.

Questions about Elementary GLOBE should be directed to Jessica Taylor at jessica.e.taylor@nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there. Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event – Virtual Field Trip to Kennedy Space Center

Join the education specialists of NASA’s Digital Learning Network as they travel to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Jan. 12, 2017. The multipart series of Virtual Field Trips will feature different landmarks and projects taking place at Kennedy.

Explore Kennedy Space Center during the following 30-minute sessions:

10 a.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Caryn Long from NASA’s Langley Research Center and Lisa Ilowsky from NASA’s Ames Research Center to learn more about the Vehicle Assembly Building and Mobile Launch Pad.

Noon EST — Join DLN education specialists Lindsey Jones from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Rachel Power from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center to learn more about Kennedy’s Swamp Works project.

2 p.m. EST — Join DLN education specialists Kristy Brumfield from NASA’s Stennis Space Center and David Alexander from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center to learn more about the Orion and Crew Exploration Vehicle.

Up to three schools will be able to join DLN live and interactively during each of the three individual webcasts. To register for this opportunity, please complete the form found at https://goo.gl/forms/U4UvoCJXHSCpDZNv2. Each school may request to participate in only one session.

Schools that are not selected to be a part of the interactive audience will be able to view the webcast event live at https://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo.

For more information about this and other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please send them to dlinfochannel@gmail.com.


2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Exoplanets: The Quest for Strange New Worlds
Event Date:
Jan. 12 and Jan. 13, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=1
Exoplanets, planets orbiting other stars, have become an important field of astronomical study over the past two-and-a-half decades. Join Dr. Eric Mamajek from the NASA Exoplanet Exploration Program at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a discussion about the recent findings from NASA’s Kepler mission that suggest nearly every star you see in the night sky has exoplanets orbiting it.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Research Grants: Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research

The Partnerships for Enhanced Engagement in Research, or PEER, program is a competitive awards program that invites scientists in developing countries to apply for funds to support research and capacity-building activities on topics of importance to the United States Agency for International Development and conducted in partnership with U.S. government-supported and selected private sector partners.

PEER applicants who submit pre-proposals to PEER must be based at an academic institution, nonprofit organization, or government-managed research laboratory, center or institute in a PEER-eligible country. Applicants also must hold a career-track position or equivalent at their respective institution or organization. Applicants should be working in the country from which they are applying and should be nationals (citizens or permanent residents) of a PEER-eligible country for the focus area to which they are applying.

The deadline for submission of pre-proposals is Jan. 13, 2017. Pre-proposals should be completed through the PEER online application site no later than 11:59 p.m. (U.S. Eastern Standard Time) on that date.

For more information, visit http://www.nationalacademies.org/peer.

The PEER program is supported by the United States Agency for International Development and implemented by the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to peer@nas.edu.


Free Educator Workshop: Earth Science Workshop

Explore the impact of increasing global temperature on glaciers and sea level using real satellite data from NASA. Then, discover ways to turn these resources into engineering, mathematics and science lessons for students. Finally, learn to use the engineering design process to develop water-filtration and recycling systems to minimize our adverse impact on the water cycle.

Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 14, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. PST for this workshop at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s JPL in Pasadena, California.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/14/earth-science-workshop/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore these lessons online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/water-filtration-challenge/ and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/the-science-of-earths-rising-seas/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Paula Partida at Paula.S.Partida@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free Educator Workshop — Solar System and Beyond: Modern Figures

Join the Office of Education of NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center for an educator professional development workshop as we look back at the history of human computers like Katherine Johnson and look forward toward exploration of the solar system. Learn about OSIRIS-REx (Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security – Regolith Explorer) on its search for asteroids using modern-day technology to calculate launch windows and orbits. Educators will engage in standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about launch windows, planetary orbits and robotics. Participants will receive hands-on activities for students that combine math, science, engineering and social studies.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017, 4:30-6 p.m. PST at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/erc_workshop_01_18_17a.pdf

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


2017 RASC-AL Aerospace Concepts Design Competition

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage Aerospace Concepts competition. RASC-AL is a design project competition for university-level engineering students and faculty.

The 2017 RASC-AL competition challenges teams to develop new concepts that leverage innovations to improve our ability to work more effectively in microgravity, by responding to one of four themes:
— Lightweight Exercise Suite.
— Airlock Design.
— Commercially enabled LEO/Mars Habitable Module.
— Logistics Delivery System.

Potentially, NASA could implement concepts derived from the design projects.

Interested teams must submit an abstract for their proposed project by Jan. 19, 2017.

NEW THIS YEAR: As a part of the abstract proposal submission process, teams will be required to include a two-minute video. The intent is for the video to augment each team’s abstract proposal by including animation, graphics, or other creative ways of showcasing unique aspects of their proposed concept.

The 2017 RASC-AL Competition will implement a two-tiered down-select process. A steering committee of NASA and industry experts will evaluate the abstract and video proposals and select as many as 20 undergraduate or graduate teams to move to the next phase of the competition. Based on evaluation of five- to seven-page mid-project papers submitted by these teams in mid-March, the field will be narrowed once again to 12-16 teams who will be selected for the final round of the competition. The finalists will present their concepts to the panel of judges (the RASC-AL Steering Committee) at the RASC-AL Forum in June 2017 in Florida.

The RASC-AL competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering or science at an accredited college or university. University design teams must include one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and two or more undergraduate or graduate students. A group of universities also may collaborate on a design project entry. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowships for Early Career Researchers

The Nancy Grace Roman Technology Fellowship in astrophysics seeks to provide early-career researchers the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to lead astrophysics flight instrument development projects, including suborbital investigations, in preparation to become principal investigators of future astrophysics missions; to develop innovative technologies for space astrophysics that have the potential to enable major scientific breakthroughs; and to foster new talent by putting early-career instrument builders on a trajectory toward long-term positions. NASA is committed to supporting deserving early-career researchers by selecting one or more Roman Technology Fellows every year.

This fellowship consists of two components with two different submission procedures. (1) The first component is the application to be named a Roman Technology Fellow through a one-page application submitted along with a proposal submitted to D.3, the Astrophysics Research and Analysis, or APRA, program element. (2) The second component is the subsequent submission of a proposal for up to $300K in fellowship funds by a previously selected Roman Technology Fellow once that individual obtains a permanent or permanent track position.

A notice of intent to submit a proposal is required and is due Jan. 20, 2017. Proposals are due March 17, 2017.

For complete fellowship details and application procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2hmrro0.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to William Lightsey at Billy.Lightsey@nasa.gov.


Educator Workshop: Utilizing Renewable Energy

Learn how to help students break down complex issues into more manageable pieces in a lesson that explores the math, science and engineering considerations involved in using solar energy. Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Jan. 21, 2017, from 10 a.m. to noon PST for this workshop at the Columbia Memorial Space Center in Downey, California.

The workshop is free for all pre-service and fully credentialed teachers! Participants must bring their teacher or student ID the day of the workshop. Lunch will be provided.

Pre-registration is required. For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/1/21/utilizing-renewable-energy/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore the lesson online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/think-green-utilizing-renewable-solar-energy/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sandra Valencia at (562) 231-1205.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

The Biology of Long-Term Spaceflight
Jan. 25, 2017, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
Since the first humans launched into space in 1961, there have been questions about how the human body would react outside Earth’s atmosphere. While most of the basic questions have been answered, many remain and are the basis for continued research on the International Space Station. Finding answers to these questions is an important step toward sending humans to Mars. Join the webcast to explore this research and the impact of long-term space travel on the human body.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


Future Engineers Mars Medical Challenge

Calling all students! NASA wants your help to design an object that could be used by an astronaut to maintain physical health on a three-year mission to Mars. The Mars Medical Challenge is the fifth in a series of Future Engineers Challenges where students in grades K-12 create and submit a digital 3-D model intended to be printed in 3-D and used for a wide range of medical needs including diagnostic, preventive, first-aid, emergency, surgical and/or dental purposes.

As NASA continues to investigate how the human body adjusts to weightlessness, radiation and stress that occur long-duration spaceflight, Future Engineers proposes to engage students with a related challenge. The Mars Medical Challenge asks students to design a 3-D printed object that will keep astronauts healthy during the long trip to the Red Planet. Specifically, medical and dental hardware will be emphasized during this challenge.

Students ages 5-19 are invited to become the creators and innovators of tomorrow by using 3-D modeling software to submit their designs for hardware that could be used by astronauts on a future mission to Mars. Students have the opportunity to win prizes ranging from a Mars prize pack or a 3-D printer for their school to a trip to Houston for a tour of NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The challenge closes on Jan. 25, 2017, and winners will be announced on March 28, 2017.

What health-related items do you think an astronaut will need on that journey, and why would these items require a 3-D printer? It’s time to start flexing your problem-solving and design skills to find a solution – good luck!

For more information about the challenge and how to enter, visit www.futureengineers.org/marsmedical.


U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Summer Internship Program

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Summer Internship Program provides opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to participate in projects at federal research facilities located across the country. The projects interns take part in will help DNDO meet its mission of “implementing domestic nuclear detection efforts for a managed and coordinated response to radiological and nuclear threats, as well as integration of federal nuclear forensics programs.”

Applicants must be U.S. citizens and at least 18 years of age by May 1, 2017. Students must have a GPA of 3.3 or higher on a 4.0 scale and must be majoring in a STEM field with interest in nuclear detection and in radiological and nuclear threats. Undergraduate applicants must be enrolled full-time as a sophomore, junior or senior at a U.S. accredited 2-year or 4-year college or university. Graduate applicants must be enrolled full-time at a U.S. accredited college or university.

Applications are due Jan. 25, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EST.

Additional information about the program, including access to the online application system may be found at http://orau.gov/dndo/.

Please direct inquiries about this opportunity to DHSed@orau.org.


Free Educator Professional Development Workshops From NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education

NASA’s Stennis Space Center Office of Education is presenting a series of free science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, educator professional development workshops open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom.

Journey to Mars
Audience
: Grades 4-8, In-service, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Registration Deadline: Jan. 22, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Jan. 26, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Launch an investigation into the Red Planet using Earth and Mars comparisons, models, and engineering design. This workshop will integrate NASA online resources and STEM classroom activities, including those from NASA’s “Modern Figures” campaign. “Modern Figures” activities highlight the contributions made by the African American women called “human computers,” as seen in the new movie “Hidden Figures.” The workshop will be presented at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
Register Online: https://www.etouches.com/219171

NASA Aeronautics: The Science of Flight
Audience
: Grades 4-8, In-service, Informal and Pre-service Educators
Registration Deadline: Feb. 19, 2017 (maximum of 30 participants)
Event Date: Feb. 23, 2017, 9 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. CST
Explore basic principles of flight, construct aircraft models, and use the engineering design process to make these activities educationally challenging. NASA aeronautics technology will be introduced. Learn how these inquiry-based lessons can help students develop concepts, practice data analysis skills, and relate their investigations to real-world applications. The workshop will be presented at the Infinity Science Center in Pearlington, Mississippi. (Map).
Register Online: https://www.etouches.com/219187

For more information on the upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development workshops, email Aprill McIntosh at april.l.mcintosh@nasa.gov.


2017 NOAA Undergraduate Scholarships

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is accepting applications for its 2017 Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship and 2017 Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Programs.

The Educational Partnership Program Undergraduate Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study to students majoring in STEM fields that directly support NOAA’s mission. Participants conduct research at a NOAA facility during two paid summer internships. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. Students attending an accredited Minority Serving Institution as defined by the U.S. Department of Education (Hispanic Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaskan-Native Serving Institutions, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions) are eligible to apply for the program. The institutions must be within the United States or U.S. Territories. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and must earn and maintain a minimum 3.2 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

The Ernest F. Hollings Scholarship Program provides scholarships for two years of undergraduate study with a paid internship at a NOAA facility during the interim summer session. A stipend and housing allowance is provided. Applicants must be U.S. citizens enrolled full-time at an accredited college or university. Applicants must have and maintain a declared major in a discipline including, but not limited to, oceanic, environmental, biological and atmospheric sciences; mathematics; engineering; remote-sensing technology; physical and social sciences including geography, physics, hydrology and geomatics; or teacher education that supports NOAA’s programs and mission. Participants must earn and maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Applications for both scholarship programs are due Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit http://www.oesd.noaa.gov/scholarships/.

Please direct questions about these scholarship opportunities to StudentScholarshipPrograms@noaa.gov.


Center for Retirement Research’s Steven H. Sandell Grant Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College is soliciting proposals for the annual Steven H. Sandell Grant Program for scholars in the field of retirement research and policy. The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration to provide opportunities scholars to pursue cutting-edge projects on retirement income issues.

Junior scholars within the first 10 years of their academic career or senior scholars working in a new area are encouraged to submit a proposal. The center welcomes applications from all academic disciplines.

Up to five grants of $45,000 will be awarded based upon the quality of the applicant’s proposal and his or her proposed budget. Applicants must complete the research outlined in the proposal within one year of the award. Grant recipients may be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, D.C., or Baltimore.

The proposal submission deadline is Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit http://crr.bc.edu/about-us/grant-programs/steven-h-sandell-grant-program-2/.

Questions about this grant opportunity should be directed to Marina Tsiknis at tsiknis@bc.edu.


Center for Retirement Research’s Dissertation Fellowship Program

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College is soliciting proposals for the annual Dissertation Fellowship Program in the field of retirement income research. The program is funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration and provides funding opportunities for doctoral candidates to pursue cutting-edge research on retirement issues.

Applicants must be enrolled in a qualified doctoral program at a U.S. university and have completed all course work for a Ph.D. by the time funding would start. Applicants must demonstrate that their dissertation focuses on one of the following research priorities: (1) Social Security and retirement income and policy; (2) macroeconomic analyses of Social Security; (3) wealth and retirement income; (4) program interactions; (5) international research; or (6) demographic research. Applicants must have a dissertation advisor and/or committee and have the chair of the dissertation committee confirm that he or she has read and approved the research methodology for the proposal. Doctoral candidates from all academic disciplines are encouraged to submit a proposal.

Up to five fellowships of $28,000 will be awarded. Recipients may be required to present their work to the Social Security Administration in Washington, D.C., or Baltimore.

The application submission deadline is Jan. 31, 2017.

For more information, visit http://crr.bc.edu/about-us/grant-programs/dissertation-fellowship-program-2/.

Questions about this grant opportunity should be directed to Marina Tsiknis at tsiknis@bc.edu.


NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowships Program Accepting Proposals for 2017-2018 Academic Year

The NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship program is soliciting applications from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of individuals pursuing master’s or doctoral degrees in Earth and space sciences, or related disciplines, for the 2017-2018 academic year. The purpose of NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines needed to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection will be training grants to the respective universities, with the advisor serving as the principal investigator. Financial support for the NESSF program comes from the Science Mission Directorate’s four science divisions: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Planetary Science and Astrophysics.

Initially, NESSF awards are made for one year. They may be renewed for up to two additional years, contingent upon satisfactory progress (as reflected in academic performance, research progress and recommendation by the faculty advisor) and the availability of funds.

The maximum amount of a NESSF award is $45,000 per year.

Proposals for this opportunity are due Feb. 1, 2017.

For more information about this solicitation, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2f2baB3.

Questions about Earth Science Research NESSF opportunities should be directed to Claire Macaulay at Claire.I.Macaulay@nasa.gov.

Questions about Heliophysics Research, Planetary Science Research and Astrophysics Research opportunities should be directed to Dolores Holland at hq-nessf-Space@nasa.gov


NASA History Program Office Internships — Summer 2017

The NASA History Program Office is seeking undergraduate and graduate students for summer 2017 internships. The History Program Office maintains archival materials to answer research questions from NASA personnel, journalists, scholars, students at all levels and others from around the world. The division also edits and publishes several books and monographs each year. It maintains a large number of websites on NASA history.

Students of all majors are welcome to apply. While detailed prior knowledge of the aeronautics and space fields is not necessary, a keen interest and some basic familiarity with these topics are needed. Strong research, writing and editing skills are essential. Experience with social media is a plus.

Intern projects are flexible. Typical projects include handling a variety of information requests, writing posts for the NASA history Twitter and Facebook pages, editing historical manuscripts, doing research and writing biographical sketches, and identifying and captioning photos.

Applications for summer 2017 internships are due Feb. 1, 2017. Applications for fall 2017 internship applications are due June 1, 2017 and applications for spring 2018 internships are due Oct. 1, 2017.

For more information, visit http://history.nasa.gov/interncall.htm.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Bill Barry at bill.barry@nasa.gov.


2017 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge

NASA has opened team registration for the 2017 NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge. Organized by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, the event will be held March 30 – April 1, 2017, at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville.

The challenge engages high school, college and university students in hands-on, experiential learning activities, while also testing potential technologies needed for future deep space exploration.

Student teams participating in the rover challenge must design, engineer and test a human-powered rover on a mock course designed to simulate the harsh and demanding terrains future NASA explorers may find on distant planets, moons and asteroids.

Registration for U.S. teams closes Feb. 1, 2017. Each school may enter up to two teams.

For more information on the 2017 Human Exploration Rover Challenge and registration, visit https://www.nasa.gov/roverchallenge/home/index.html.

Teams with questions about this event or registration may email Diedra Williams at MSFC-RoverChallenge2017@mail.nasa.gov.


2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport

NASA’s Aeronautics Mission Directorate is seeking entries for the 2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenge. Students are invited to submit technical papers outlining their solutions for one of two aeronautics design challenges.

The Supersonic Business Jet Challenge seeks ideas for a commercial supersonic business jet that might fly in 2025 and that meets NASA’s goals for noise, emissions, speed, range, payload and fuel efficiency. The Low Noise Subsonic Transport Challenge seeks designs for a large commercial airliner that would enter service between 2025 and 2035 and would address NASA’s goals for reductions in noise, emissions and fuel use.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This particular design challenge is for colleges and universities only. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

An optional notice of intent is requested by Feb. 1, 2017. Final entries are due June 1, 2017.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Nov. 17, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Nov. 20, 2016, at 5 p.m. EDT

Spring 2017 University Student Design Challenge at NASA’s Glenn Research Center
Audience: Undergraduate Students
Registration Deadline: Nov. 23, 2016

2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge
Audience: All Educators and Students, Home School Parents and After-school Groups
Registration Deadline: Dec. 31, 2016
Challenge Dates: Jan. 12 – April 28, 2017

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event
Audience: All
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, 11 a.m. – noon EST

New Publication from NASA’s Earth Observatory — EO Kids
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Dates: Nov. 17, 2016, 8 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. EST

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Nov. 17, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Entry Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity
Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 22, 2016

Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest
Audience: Students 4 to 12 Years Old
Entry Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

2017 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space
Audience: Educators and Students, Ages 14 to 18
Entry Deadline: Dec. 3, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!
Audience: K-12 Educators

2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Dec. 16, 2016

2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference
Audience: K-12 Educators
Early Bird Registration Deadline: Dec. 30, 2016
Event Date: Feb. 9-11, 2017

Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017
Audience: Current and Future College Instructors of Astronomy
Next Event Date: Jan. 4, 2017

U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 9-12
Registration Deadline: Feb. 3, 2017
Infographic Submission Deadline: March 3, 2017

Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: March 1, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA Unveils New Public Web Portal for Research Results
Audience: All Educators and Students

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Free “NASA’s Journey to Mars” Planetarium/Dome Show
Audience: All Formal and Informal Educators

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: Images and Data
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Nov. 21, 2016, at 5 p.m. EST
Explore NASA resources for using images and data in the classroom. These resources can be used to engage students, illustrate concepts, and develop educational exhibits, programs or products. Learn about the latest science discoveries and more at http://nasawavelength.org/data-and-images. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/203264

Astrobiology and the Origin of Life
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-12
Event Date: Nov. 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. EST
Learn how NASA has turned the search for alien life from science fiction to a quickly growing research field. Topics in earth and space science linked to biology will help us understand the most current theories for how life came to be here on Earth and where we could find it next. Classroom activities fit for numerous grade levels will put this exploration into the hands of our next generation of scientists! Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/198801

NASA Technology in Your Classroom: NASA Apps for All Ages
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Nov. 22, 2016, at 4 p.m. EST
NASA has over 50 FREE apps for educational use. Learn how to use and integrate some of the applications in the classroom setting. Virtual reality, 3-D exploration and NASA missions come alive with the use of these apps. Engage students on topics such as earth science, the solar system, robotics and space station research through the usage of technology apps. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/202778

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Spring 2017 University Student Design Challenge at NASA’s Glenn Research Center

NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Ohio has been researching and developing innovative technologies in both aeronautics and spaceflight for 75 years. As an opportunity to further involve undergraduate students, Glenn is hosting a spring 2017 University Student Design Challenge with aeronautics and space themes.

The competition is open to teams of full-time undergraduate students who are sophomores, juniors or seniors enrolled at accredited U.S. academic institutions. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged and will be composed primarily of science, technology, engineering and mathematics majors. However, the team formation also may comprise students majoring in areas such as economics, marketing, graphic arts, or other non-STEM disciplines that will aid in the success of the design challenge. Each university or college team must have at least one faculty advisor. Participants will have access to technical experts at Glenn.

Interested teams must register by Nov. 23, 2016.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/university-student-design-challenge. Questions about this competition may be directed to grc-university-design-challenge@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut “Walk to the Moon” Challenge

Mission X encourages children of all ages, as well as people with particular needs, to pursue healthy lifestyles based on the model of training like an astronaut. During six- to nine-week “challenges” each fall and spring, schools and student groups from around the world complete Mission X classroom-based science lessons and physical education activities.

In 2017, Mission X is challenging Fit Explorers around the world to work together to perform activities that will move Astro Charlie the 478 million steps it would take to walk from Earth to the moon! That’s 238,857 miles, or 384,403 kilometers! At an average walking speed, that would take one person about nine years to complete.

The challenge kicks off in January. For full challenge details and to do your part to help reach this out-of-this-world goal, visit http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/wttm. The deadline to register for this challenge is Dec. 31, 2016. You may apply for Team USA at http://trainlikeanastronaut.org/usa_application.

In 2016, Mission X was represented by 30 countries and more than 53,000 participants. The challenge was available in 17 languages.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Nubia Carvajal at nubia.a.carvajal@nasa.gov.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Presents: ‘Hidden Figures’ Virtual Event
Audience: All
Event Date: Dec. 1, 2016, 11 a.m. – noon EST

You might think you know NASA’s story, but there’s always a story behind the story. Did you know the first computers were people? That in the early days of spaceflight, there were women (including minorities) working to make sure that the United States was able to successfully launch humans into space and breaking social barriers at the same time?

Join NASA experts, director Ted Melfi, and Octavia Spencer, who plays Dorothy Vaughn in the film “Hidden Figures,” through NASA’s Digital Learning Network on Dec. 1, 2016, at 11 a.m. EST, to discuss NASA’s hidden story, learn about how NASA’s story continues, and how history and filmmaking are an important part of our space program.

To register to participate in the interactive videoconference, visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdZZNXHDM25mJ4XOfTjvDHuJ18QyRHyw1XM5-NBtSwz0qvvrw/viewform.

This event will also be webcast live at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo2 and broadcast on NASA TV at https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv.


New Publication from NASA’s Earth Observatory — EO Kids

NASA is introducing a new publication from its Earth Observatory — EO Kids — bringing engaging science stories from the Earth Observatory to a younger audience.

The premier issue of EO Kids explores how NASA observes and measures fresh water from space. Find out why Lake Mead appears to have a bathtub ring around its shoreline and how less snow in the mountains means less drinking water for California. Explore satellite images of where fresh water is stored in and on Earth. Discover what NASA does in the field with an update from scientists on the Olympic Mountain Experiment (OLYMPEX) campaign.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. The Maker Corner provides instructions for making a model aquifer and a self-watering planter. Explore the science behind fresh water with a snowmelt experiment, and be a data detective by analyzing satellite data like a scientist. Kids can even create their own data visualization by coloring in a map showing ice thickness on Greenland.

To download your copy of the EO Kids: Fresh Water issue, visit http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/eokids.

To learn more about NASA’s missions to study Earth, visit the Earth Observatory at http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


Celebrate American Education Week With a Virtual Career Panel From NASA’s Digital Learning Network

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network in celebrating American Education Week, Nov. 14-18, 2016. The DLN invites you to take part in a virtual career panel with experts from various disciplines across NASA on Nov. 17, 2016. The all-day event will feature 30-minute discussions from NASA professionals at the top of each hour.

8-8:30 a.m. EST — Kick-off with Kennedy Space Center Director Astronaut Robert Cabana
Robert Cabana is a former NASA astronaut, currently serving as director of NASA’s John F. Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In his current role, Cabana manages all NASA facilities and activities at the spaceport, including the team of civil service and contractor employees who operate and support numerous space programs and projects.

9-9:30 a.m. EST — Josh Fody, Thermal Engineer at Langley Research Center (Project: CHIEFS)
Josh Fody is a thermal engineer on the CHIEFS project who is working on designing a Ceramic Matrix Composite heat exchanger with tubeless imbedded cooling channels. The purpose of the application is to keep engine combustion section walls cooler longer for hypersonic aircraft.

10-10:30 a.m. EST — Kurt Leucht, Software Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Project: Swarmies)
Kurt Leucht is a software engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. For much of his 25-year career, he has developed command and control systems and also robotic systems that are used for in-situ resource utilization, or ISRU, research projects. These ISRU robots could support future human Mars missions where astronauts will live off the land to survive and thrive.

11-11:30 a.m. EST — Kate Cryderman, Engineer at Kennedy Space Center (Projects: RESOLVE, LAVA)
Kate Cryderman is an engineer on RESOLVE (Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction) — the primary payload on the Resource Prospector mission planned for launch in the early 2020s. The Resource Prospector will prospect for lunar volatiles to better understand how local materials can be used to support exploration beyond low Earth orbit. Cryderman works on the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis, or LAVA, subsystem, where her primary responsibilities include hardware integration and testing to support design trade studies and flight hardware development.

Noon-12:30 p.m. EST — Margaret Domingues, Optical Engineer at Goddard Space Flight Center (Graduate Coop, Pathways Intern)
Domingues is an optical engineer at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight center. She originally came to Goddard as a summer intern, and then as a graduate COOP. She received her graduate degree from the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. In the optics branch at Goddard, she been working on optical engineering and testing for the James Webb Space Telescope.

1-1:30 p.m. EST — Anne Meier, Chemical Engineer at Kennedy Space Center
Anne Meier is a chemical engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center working on several projects that focus on deep space exploration and resource reutilization for human spaceflight. One project is an in-situ resource reutilization system called the Mars Atmospheric Processing Module. The Atmospheric Processing Module is a system that collects and converts the carbon dioxide from the Mars atmosphere using dual cryocoolers and converts the carbon dioxide into methane (fuel) and water. Another project includes the development of a system that converts logistical space trash into useful byproducts for volume reduction and fuel production. As a crew member of the 2014 HI-SEAS Mars analog simulation, Meier took part in a 120-day psychological study and performed various research projects while living in an isolated Mars-like habitat with an international crew.

2-2:30 p.m. EST — Michael Cooney, Electrical Engineer at Langley Research Center (Projects: MEDLI2, GL-10)
Michael Cooney is an electrical engineer designing and testing hardware for the MEDLI2 experiment, an instrument suite to be installed in the heat shield and backshell of the Mars 2020 aeroshell. He also is working in a systems engineering capacity on the GL-10, an all-electrical, Vertical Take Off and Landing Unmanned Air Vehicle. Cooney recently has worked on designing hardware for multiple CubeSat missions. Before joining NASA Langley, Cooney worked and attended college at the University of Hawaii.

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-dlinfo. Three schools will be selected to interact with speakers during each event. To apply for this special opportunity, visit https://goo.gl/forms/ZqyJZj5edCCIz4np2.

For additional details about the events and more information about the featured experts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/American-Education-Week.

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

The James Webb Space Telescope: Successor to Hubble
Event Date:
Nov. 17 and Nov. 18, 2016, at 7 p.m. PST (10 p.m. EST)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=11
After its launch in late 2018, the James Webb Space Telescope will help revolutionize study of the cosmos. Built to address the questions beyond the capabilities of the Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes, JWST will look more deeply at infrared wavelengths with instruments with capabilities not previously available. Join Dr. Michael Ressler for a discussion about JWST as a whole but focused on the Mid-Infrared Instrument, the longest wavelength instrument on JWST.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge. This new special edition challenge for 2017 is taking place in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center! This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students and is one of several NASA RASC-AL competitions.

The Mars Ice Challenge requires participants to build a prototype ice drilling system. Teams will compete to extract the most water from simulated Martian subsurface ice at NASA Langley in a three-day competition during summer 2017. During this competition, each participating team will receive a simulated subsurface ice test station composed of solid blocks of ice. The blocks will be in an ice container with a layer of overburden (dirt, rocks, etc.) on top. After drilling through the overburden into the ice, teams must devise innovative solutions to deliver clean water from the ice to an external storage tank (filtering out sediments).

Up to four members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to NASA Langley for the onsite testing. The drilling and water extraction systems must operate autonomously or via teleoperation, and they are subject to mass, volume and power constraints.

After completion of the test and validation portion of the project, teams will present their drilling concepts to a design review panel composed of NASA judges. Presentations will be based on the team’s technical paper that details the drill concept’s path-to-flight (how the design can be applied to actual drilling on Mars).

Teams must submit a project plan for their proposed system by Nov. 17, 2016.

A Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at NASA’s Langley Research Center in summer 2017. Each of the selected teams will receive a $10,000 stipend to develop their drilling and water extraction system.

The RASCAL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university in the United States. University design teams must include (a) one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and (b) two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org/mars-ice-challenge.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts who can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 22, 2016. NASA will choose the payloads by Feb. 17, 2017, but initial selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Certain selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2017 and running through 2020. NASA does not fund the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and U.S. accredited educational organizations.

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 18 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one “cube,” or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat’s final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

To date, NASA has selected 119 CubeSat missions from 66 unique organizations. Of those missions, 46 have been launched into space with 29 more CubeSats scheduled to go in the next 12 months.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.


Commercial Crew 2017 Calendar Artwork Contest

NASA’s Commercial Crew Program is holding an artwork contest for students 4 to 12 years old. The artwork will be used to create a 2017 calendar. Each month will have a different theme related to the International Space Station, astronauts, growing food in space and more! Unique and original artwork will be selected for each month. Once the calendar is complete, NASA will transmit it to astronauts aboard the space station. The calendar also will include supplemental education materials for kids on Earth to learn more about the space-related themes.

Entries are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For complete contest rules and submission guidelines, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/commercial-crew-2017-calendar-artwork-contest.

Please direct questions about this contest to ksc-connect2ccp@mail.nasa.gov.


2017 BIG Idea Challenge

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA’s Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

Proposals are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.


Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space

Imagine what it would be like to live in space. What kind of shelter would you live in? What kind of protection would you have from the elements? How long could you stay there?

On Earth, humans are protected from radiation by the atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field. Astronauts on the space station are above the atmosphere and receive a higher dose of radiation than when they are on the ground. The harmful effects of radiation that come from the sun and other sources outside the solar system pose danger to humans living and working in space.

Radiation is one of the top concerns for humans living in deep space for long durations. A NASA group called RadWorks is using radiation detectors the size of USB thumb drives to collect data inside the International Space Station. Together with the University of Houston and the Institute for Research in Schools, RadWorks is sharing the data with high school students who are helping to analyze the radiation that astronaut Tim Peake is exposed to during his time aboard the International Space Station.

NASA is making this same data available to teachers and students through the TimPix project administered by the Institute for Research in Schools, with funding from the European Space Agency and the United Kingdom Space Agency. During European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake’s time aboard the station, data is taken many times a minute while in orbit. A variety of data sets are currently available, and others are being added as the mission progresses. Aimed at high school physics classes, the TimPix project allows students ages 14-18 to access and analyze radiation data during Peake’s mission. They are able to take part in authentic research occurring aboard the station. What type of radiation is present? What impact do different altitudes or locations around the world have on the number and types of particles detected? What happens during a solar flare? Join us in helping NASA answer these questions!

For more information about NASA’s Radworks project, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/view/10581.

For more information or to register for the TimPix project, email timpix@researchinschools.org.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Mars Survival Kit: Lessons and Activities to Guide Your Exploration of Mars!

NASA is embarking on a journey to Mars! Are your students ready to join in the adventure? Spark excitement in your classroom with the Mars Survival Kit.

The Mars Survival Kit is a collection of educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to the Next Generation Science Standards.

Start your classroom’s journey to Mars at http://go.nasa.gov/1NnZ0Rg.

To learn more about NASA’s Journey to Mars, visit https://www.nasa.gov/topics/journeytomars/index.html.


2017 High-Altitude Student Platform Opportunity

The Louisiana Space Consortium, or LaSPACE, is accepting applications from students at U.S. colleges and universities who want to send experiments to the edge of space on a high-flying scientific balloon.

The annual project, supported by the NASA Balloon Program Office and LaSPACE, provides near-space access for 12 undergraduate and graduate student experiments to be carried by a NASA high-altitude research balloon. The flights typically last 15 to 20 hours and reach an altitude of 23 miles. Experiments may include compact satellites or prototypes.

The experiments are flown aboard the High-Altitude Student Platform, or HASP, a balloon-born instrument stack launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility’s remote site in Fort Sumner, New Mexico. The goals of the project are to provide a space test platform to encourage student research and stimulate the development of student satellite payloads and other space-engineering products.

HASP seeks to enhance the technical skills and research abilities of students in critical science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines.

The deadline for applications is Dec. 16, 2016.

For application information and technical details about the program, visit http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp.

Questions about the High-Altitude Student Platform opportunity should be directed to T. Gregory Guzik at guzik@phunds.phys.lsu.edu.


2017 Space Exploration Educators Conference

Make plans to attend the 23rd Annual Space Exploration Educators Conference to be held Feb. 9-11, 2017, at Space Center Houston. This conference is for all K-12 educators. Activities presented use space-related themes to teach across the curricula. The activities may be used for science, language arts, mathematics, history and more.

Attend sessions hosted by scientists and engineers working on exciting projects like the International Space Station and the exploration of Mars and other parts of our solar system. Hear from astronauts who will be “leading the charge” in exploration. Attend sessions presented by educators and receive ready-to-implement classroom ideas. Attendees can earn up to 24 hours of continuing professional education credit.

For discounted registration, sign up to attend before the Early Bird Registration deadline on Dec. 30, 2016!

For more information, visit http://spacecenter.org/teacher-programs/teachers-seec/.

Please email any questions about the conference to seec@spacecenter.org.


Center for Astronomy Education Regional Teaching Exchanges and Workshops — Fall/Winter 2016-2017

NASA’s Center for Astronomy Education, or CAE, announces a series of regional teaching exchanges and workshops for astronomy and space science educators.

Teaching exchanges foster a sense of community among geographically linked current and future college instructors of astronomy. Regional experts from the broader CAE community are ready to provide the opportunity for you to meet your neighbors, expand your instructional repertoire and share your own expertise.

Workshops provide participants with experiences needed to create effective and productive active-learning classroom environments. Workshop leaders model best practices in implementing many different classroom-tested instructional strategies. But more importantly, workshop participants will gain first-hand experience implementing these proven strategies.

Jan. 4, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching About Exoplanets

Jan. 5, 2017 — Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center in Grapevine, Texas
CAE Tier I Teaching Excellence Workshop — New Methods for Teaching in the Flipped Classroom

For more information and to register for the teaching exchanges, visit http://astronomy101.jpl.nasa.gov/workshops/index.cfm.

Inquiries about this series of events should be directed to Gina Brissenden at gbrissenden@as.arizona.edu.

CAE is funded through NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s Exoplanet Exploration Program.


U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge

Registration is open for the U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. This competition challenges teams of high school students to research one of five specific cross-curricular bioenergy topics and design infographics to share what they have learned through social media.

Selected infographics will be promoted nationally on the Challenge website and via social media. One team of students will be selected to present their infographic at the Bioenergy Technologies Office’s annual conference in Washington, D.C.

Registration for student teams closes on Feb. 3, 2017, and teams have until March 3, 2017, to submit their infographics.

For more information, visit http://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/infographic-challenge.

Check out the interactive BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge Map to see submissions from teams across the country from prior years. Put your school on the BioenergizeME map by participating in this year’s Challenge.

Please direct questions about the Challenge to BioenergizeME@ee.doe.gov.


Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is March 1, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA Unveils New Public Web Portal for Research Results

With the launch of a new agency public access portal, public access to NASA-funded research data now is just a click away. PubSpace is a repository of original science journal articles produced by NASA-funded research and available online without a fee.

While the agency always has made access to its research a high priority, the focus now is to make NASA science data more easily obtainable via “one-stop shopping.” This increased public access is intended to accelerate the dissemination of fundamental research results to advance scientific knowledge and help ensure the nation’s future prosperity.

The NASA-Funded Research Results portal was created in response to a 2013 request from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, which directed science-funding agencies to develop plans to increase access to the results of federally funded research. NASA’s public access plan was developed in coordination with the science and technology research community across the agency. NASA will continue to consult with the scientific community, academic institutions, publishers and other federal agencies to implement this plan and increase access to research results.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/open/researchaccess.


Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you will view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles create some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Michelle Viotti at michelle.a.viotti@jpl.nasa.gov.


Free ‘NASA’s Journey to Mars’ Planetarium/Dome Show

Are you looking for ways to prepare your students for STEM-related career opportunities? Do you want to spark their interest in pushing the boundaries of technology and innovation? Right now, NASA’s fleet of Mars robotic explorers is paving the way for human exploration of the solar system in the coming decades. Have your students join NASA in preparing for a monumental journey of a lifetime — to Mars!

“NASA’s Journey to Mars” is a short planetarium presentation that can be used in the educational domes of your school district, as well as local planetariums, to inspire interest in STEM. To learn more, including how you can acquire the show for use in your area, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/journey-of-a-lifetime-mars-education-resources/.

Please direct questions about the “NASA’s Journey to Mars” planetarium/dome show to Elsie Weigel at elsie.weigel@nasa.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message — Oct. 20, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Oct. 20, 2016, at 4:30 p.m. EDT

Free Webinar — Federal Resources for P-12 Educators Webinar
Audience: P-12 Educators
Reservation Deadline: Oct. 26, 2016, 8 p.m. EDT
Event Date: Nov. 1, 2016, 8 p.m. EDT

National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program
Audience: U.S. Graduate Students
Application Deadline: Nov. 10, 2016

NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Audience: K-12 Students
Entry Period: Nov. 1 – Dec. 31, 2016

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Cube Quest Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Next Submission Deadline: Feb. 3, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Oct. 20, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Oct. 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

ROSES-16 Amendment 33: New Program Element — Interdisciplinary Science for Eclipse 2017
Audience: Informal and Higher Education Institutions
Step-1 Proposal Deadline: Oct. 27, 2016

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Spring 2017 Policy Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 28, 2016

Virginia Earth System Science Scholars Program
Audience: Virginia High School Juniors and Seniors
Application Deadline: Oct. 30, 2016

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment
Audience: Postdoctoral Students
Required Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 31, 2016

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 1, 2016

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program
Audience: Organizations Interested in Advancing STEM Learning in Informal Environments
Full Proposal Deadline: Nov. 8, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

2017 BIG Idea Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students and Faculty
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 30, 2016

Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space
Audience: Educators and Students, Ages 14 to 18
Entry Deadline: Dec. 3, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge
Audience: All Interested U.S. Citizens, Including Higher Education Educators and Students
Deadline: No Later Than Sept. 30, 2019

Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App
Audience: All Educators and Students

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Teachers Connect: NASA Langley Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Oct. 20, 2016, at 4:30 p.m. EDT
As part of its 100th Anniversary celebration, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia has developed three digital badges geared to middle school learning standards. The badges are intended to make real-world connections to the classroom as a way to teach STEM content through the NASA context. This webinar highlights Earth Right Now teacher and student digital badges that focus on the role of clouds and cloud types in Earth’s energy budget. This webinar will walk through the NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badge site and introduce the teacher professional development badge as well as digital or printable ways to implement the activities in the classroom. The webinar also will preview the Journey to Mars and Aeronautics digital badges. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/205370

NASA Weathering the Storm — Earth Right Now: Weather to Fly By
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Oct. 24, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will learn about basic meteorological concepts and how weather conditions and weather phenomena occur. There will be hands-on, standards-aligned mathematics, science and engineering activities about density, mass, fluid dynamics and weather. Real-world connections with NASA and airplanes doing weather research will be discussed as the session highlights a partnership between NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center and NOAA with the Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology, or SHOUT, mission. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196774

NASA Weathering the Storm — Earth Right Now: Building for Hurricanes Engineering Design Challenge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Oct. 25, 2016, at 5 p.m. EDT
Whether you live in an area prone to hurricanes or not, you’ve seen images of the destruction caused by such storms. Data from satellites like the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission has vastly improved our ability to forecast the track of storms and to know when a storm will intensify. In this challenge, students take on the role of a builder by designing a building that can withstand a simulated hurricane. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199048

NASA Weathering the Storm — Earth Right Now: Meteorology Educator Guide
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-9
Event Date: Oct. 26, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will be introduced to Meteorology: An Educator’s Resource for Inquiry-Based Learning for Grades 5-9. Discussion will focus on the hands-on activities and low-cost equipment builds included in the guide. This webinar addresses Next Generation Science Standards MS-ESS2.D and HS-ESS2.D. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199129

NASA Weathering the Storm — Earth Right Now: NASA Weather Resources
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: Oct. 27, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Rain, snow and other forms of precipitation affect every part of life on Earth. NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement, or GPM, mission and the MY NASA Data website provide students and educators with resources to learn about Earth’s water cycle, weather, and climate, and the technology and societal applications of studying them. Discover classroom activities from these great resources. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/204907

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


 Free Webinar — Federal Resources for P-12 Educators Webinar
Audience: P-12 Educators
Reservation Deadline: Oct. 26, 2016, 8 p.m. EDT
Event Date: Nov. 1, 2016, 8 p.m. EDT

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Smithsonian Science Education Center are presenting the inaugural Committee on STEM Education’s “Federal Resources for P-12 Educators Webinar” on Tuesday, Nov. 1, at 8 p.m. The webinar will discuss professional development opportunities as well as tools and resources educators may use in the classroom. Participants will learn about concrete ways to connect content being taught to careers and current scientific exploration.

To register for this event, visit https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/51347856501675333. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing more information about joining the webinar.

Please direct questions about the webinar to Moritz, Melissa Melissa.Moritz@ed.gov.


National Science Foundation’s East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes Fellowship Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting applications for its East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes, or EAPSI, Fellowship Program. This program provides U.S. graduate students in science, engineering and education with an opportunity to spend eight weeks during the summer conducting research at one of seven host locations in East Asia and the Pacific. Host locations are Australia, China, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Singapore and Taiwan. The program is a collaboration between NSF and counterpart agencies in each host location.

EAPSI is open to graduate students who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents and are enrolled in a research-oriented master’s or doctoral program in science or engineering. Applicants must propose a research project in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics field supported by NSF. Applicants identify and contact host researchers on their own prior to submitting their EAPSI proposals. Lists of prospective host institutions are available at the opportunity website.

NSF provides EAPSI Fellows with a $5,000 stipend and roundtrip airplane ticket to the host location. The program’s foreign counterparts provide in-country living expenses and accommodations. (Arrangements vary by host location.)

The application submission deadline for summer 2017 is Nov. 10, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including location-specific handbooks, a How to Apply guide, and helpful tips for applicants, visit www.nsf.gov/eapsi.

Questions about this fellowship opportunity should be directed to eapsi@nsf.gov.


NASA’s Langley Research Center Centennial Student Art Contest
Calling all artists, grades K-12!

On July 17, 2017, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, will turn 100 years old! To celebrate, Langley invites you to take part in its Centennial Art Contest. The theme for this year’s contest is “A Storied Legacy, A Soaring Future.”

The contest is open to all children in grades K-12 who are attending public, private, parochial and homeschools in the United States. Artwork entries may consist of drawings, paintings, mixed media and digital creations.

A grand prize winner will be chosen from all contest entries. A first place winner will be chosen from each grade level, as well as second place, third place and honorable mention. Each entry will receive a certificate of participation.

The art contest submission period begins Nov. 1, 2016, and concludes on Dec. 31, 2016, at midnight EST.

For more information, visit https://artcontest.larc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Kristina Cors at larc-art-contest@mail.nasa.gov.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Cube Quest Challenge

Registration is open for NASA’s Cube Quest Challenge, which advances communication and propulsion technologies for CubeSats. Competitors have a shot at a share of $5 million in prize money and an opportunity to participate in space exploration and technology development. Participants can compete for a chance at flying their very own CubeSat to the moon and beyond as secondary payload on the first integrated flight of NASA’s Orion spacecraft and Space Launch System, or SLS. Or the competitors can launch their satellite using an independent launch provider.

Challenge objectives include designing, building and launching flight-qualified, small satellites capable of advanced operations near and beyond the moon. The challenge and prize purse are divided into three major areas:

— Ground Tournaments: $500,000 in the four qualifying ground tournaments to determine who will have the ability to fly on the first SLS flight

— Deep Space Derby: $1.5-million purse for demonstrating communication and CubeSat durability at a distance greater than almost 2.5 million miles (4,000,000 km), 10 times the distance from Earth to the moon

— Lunar Derby: $3-million purse for demonstrating the ability to place a CubeSat in a stable lunar orbit and demonstrate communication and durability near the moon.

The Cube Quest Challenge seeks to develop and test subsystems necessary to perform deep space exploration using small spacecraft. Advancements in small spacecraft capabilities will provide benefits to future missions and also may enable new mission scenarios, including future investigations of near-Earth asteroids.

All teams may compete in any one of the four ground tournaments, or GT. Submissions for the final tournament, GT-4, are due Feb. 3, 2017. Teams that rate high on mission safety and probability of success will receive incremental awards. Participation in GT-4 is required to earn a secondary payload spot on SLS.

Teams must register at least 30 days prior to the ground tournament in which they plan to participate. Check the Cube Quest Challenge website for updates.

The Lunar Derby focuses primarily on propulsion for small spacecraft and near-Earth communications, while the Deep Space Derby focuses on finding innovative solutions to deep space communications using small spacecraft. Together, these competitions will contribute to opening deep space exploration to nongovernment spacecraft.

For more information on the Cube Quest Challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/cubequest.

To learn more about NASA’s challenges and citizen science efforts, visit https://www.nasa.gov/solve.

Please direct any questions about the Cube Quest Challenge to James Cockrell at james.j.cockrell@nasa.gov.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Asteroid Anchors, Rock-Climbing Robots, Gecko Grippers and Other Ways to Stick in Space
Event Date:
Oct. 20 and Oct. 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=10
The ability to rove the surface of Mars has revolutionized space missions. With more advanced mobility, new targets such as cliff faces, cave ceilings, and the surfaces of asteroids and comets could be explored. Join Dr. Aaron Parness from the Extreme Environment Robotics group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a discussion about the work being done at JPL’s Robotics Rapid Prototyping Lab.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Seven Minutes of Terror: The Engineering Behind Landing on Other Planets
Oct. 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Rocket thrusters, giant airbags and a sky crane: These are just a few ways we have landed on other planets. Join the webcast to explore the engineering behind these different techniques and what is in store for future missions.

Scientist or Guinea Pig: Science on the Station
Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
Do you like being poked, prodded and analyzed? If you said yes, then you may have a future as an astronaut. Astronauts on the International Space Station don’t just conduct scientific experiments — they are part of an experiment themselves. Learning about the human factors of spaceflight is an important element to a future trip to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the effects of space on the humans who travel there.

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer
Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers’ bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join the webcast to investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and then into the history books.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


ROSES-16 Amendment 33: New Program Element — Interdisciplinary Science for Eclipse 2017
Audience: Informal and Higher Education Institutions
Step-1 Proposal Deadline: Oct. 27, 2016

A total solar eclipse is widely regarded as one of the most incredible natural phenomenon visible from Earth. On Aug. 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will traverse the continental U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina. For approximately 90 minutes, city after city along the centerline will experience two to nearly three minutes of darkness during daytime as totality moves from west to east. While the path of totality will cover a swath only 60 miles wide, the contiguous U.S. States will see at least 65% of the sun disappear behind the moon during its progression of phases. A large fraction of the population in North America is expected to witness this natural event (http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/).

The purpose of this program element is to support development of new research or enhancement of existing research, applied to the 2017 eclipse. NASA is seeking proposals that would use the special opportunity presented by the solar eclipse to study the sun, Earth, the moon, astronomy, and/or space science, including the ionosphere-thermosphere-mesosphere system. Building on existing partnerships and the use of interdisciplinary or citizen science approaches is encouraged. Citizen science involves public contributions to science, including formulating research questions, conducting experiments, collecting and analyzing data, interpreting results, making new discoveries, and/or developing new/existing technologies and applications. Citizen science is distinguished from public outreach in that the primary purpose of public involvement is to make contributions to science. All proposals must demonstrate links to the 2017 solar eclipse.

Step-1 proposals are due by Oct. 27, 2016.

Step-2 proposals are due by Nov. 30, 2016.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2cZzz8T .

Please direct questions concerning this program element to Madhulika Guhathakurta at madhulika.guhathakurta@nasa.gov.


White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Spring 2017 Policy Internship Program

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is seeking students for spring 2017 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

Policy internships are open to interested students from all majors and programs, including law school programs. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are enrolled, at least half-time, in an accredited college or university during the period of volunteer service. Students in undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in all fields are encouraged to apply.

While these positions are without compensation, the assignments provide educational enrichment, practical work experience and networking opportunities with other individuals in the science and technology policy arena.

Applications for spring 2017 internships are due Oct. 28, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Rebecca Grimm at rgrimm@ostp.eop.gov.


Virginia Earth System Science Scholars Program

The Virginia Earth System Science Scholars, or VESSS, program is an interactive online science, technology, engineering and mathematics learning experience for Virginia high school juniors and seniors. The program will select 175 high school juniors and seniors statewide to participate in the inaugural offering of the online course from December 2016 through April 2017. Three dual-enrollment college credits will be offered through Thomas Nelson Community College with costs underwritten by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

About 90 students who perform well in the online course will be selected to attend one of two one-week residential summer academies at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. At the academy, students will work with mentors to apply course content and NASA data to real-world applications. It is anticipated that one additional college credit will be offered for successful completion of the academy.

VESSS partners include the Hampton University Center for Atmospheric Research and Education, NASA’s Langley Research Center, and Thomas Nelson Community College.

Applications are due Oct. 30, 2016.

For more information and to complete the online application for the 2016-2017 course, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/VESSS/.

Please email any questions about this program to Joyce Corriere at jcorrier@odu.edu.


Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment

NASA is seeking proposals from potential postdoctoral fellows to conduct studies to characterize microbial populations isolated from the International Space Station. Selected studies will provide insight into how microbes and microbial populations adapt to spaceflight. Proposed experiments will use microbial isolates collected from the space station that have been archived at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Proposals will be accepted from graduate students in their final year of their Ph.D. or equivalent degree program; from postdoctoral fellows (Ph.D., M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., or equivalent doctoral degree from an accredited domestic or foreign institution); or from applicants who received a doctoral degree within the past two years but have not yet had postdoctoral training. Applicants must have no more than four years of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the initial or the subsequent resubmission or revision application. The program is open to U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or persons with pre-existing visas obtained through their sponsoring institutions that permit postdoctoral training for the project’s duration. Sponsoring institutions must be U.S. academic, government or commercial institutions that will provide appropriate mentors.

Interested applicants must submit a required notice of intent no later than Oct. 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2eup7bg.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Dr. David Tomko at dtomko@nasa.gov.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between July 1 – Dec. 31, 2017. Proposals are due Nov. 1, 2016.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, what it is like to work in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut and ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.


NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA’s mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA’s missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to https://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity to npphelp@usra.edu.


National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, program. This program seeks to advance new approaches to evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; to provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and to advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.

Proposals are due Nov. 8, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15593/nsf15593.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLAISL@NSF.gov.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.


2017 BIG Idea Challenge

NASA’s Game Changing Development Program and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Breakthrough, Innovative, and Game-changing Idea Challenge. The BIG Idea Challenge invites teams and their faculty advisors to work together to design and analyze potential modular concepts and systems that provide the ability to construct large solar electric propulsion, or SEP, tugs in space that can transfer payloads for low Earth orbit to a lunar distant retrograde orbit. Concepts can employ new approaches for packaging modules in one or more launch vehicles that minimize launch loads; modular (distributed) solar arrays and ion engines; and robust robotic assembly (joining) of the modules that form the SEP tug.

Interested teams of three to five undergraduate and/or graduate students will submit proposals (eight to10 pages) describing their BIG Idea. Based on a review of the proposals, four teams will be selected to submit full technical papers and present their concepts to a panel of NASA judges at the 2017 BIG Idea Forum at NASA’s Langley Research Center on Feb. 15 and 16, 2017, in Hampton, Virginia.

The final four qualifying teams will receive a $6,000 stipend to facilitate participation in the BIG Idea Forum. The winning team will receive offers to participate in paid internships with the Game Changing Development team at Langley Research Center where they can work toward further developing their concept under the mentorship of NASA experts.

Proposals are due Nov. 30, 2016.

For full competition details, including design constraints and submission guidelines, please visit http://BigIdea.nianet.org.

If you have any questions about the competition, please contact BigIdea@nianet.org.


Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space

Imagine what it would be like to live in space. What kind of shelter would you live in? What kind of protection would you have from the elements? How long could you stay there?

On Earth, humans are protected from radiation by the atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field. Astronauts on the space station are above the atmosphere and receive a higher dose of radiation than when they are on the ground. The harmful effects of radiation that come from the sun and other sources outside the solar system pose danger to humans living and working in space.

Radiation is one of the top concerns for humans living in deep space for long durations. A NASA group called RadWorks is using radiation detectors the size of USB thumb drives to collect data inside the International Space Station. Together with the University of Houston and the Institute for Research in Schools, RadWorks is sharing the data with high school students who are helping to analyze the radiation that astronaut Tim Peake is exposed to during his time aboard the International Space Station.

NASA is making this same data available to teachers and students through the TimPix project administered by the Institute for Research in Schools, with funding from the European Space Agency and the United Kingdom Space Agency. During European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake’s time aboard the station, data is taken many times a minute while in orbit. A variety of data sets are currently available, and others are being added as the mission progresses. Aimed at high school physics classes, the TimPix project allows students ages 14-18 to access and analyze radiation data during Peake’s mission. They are able to take part in authentic research occurring aboard the station. What type of radiation is present? What impact do different altitudes or locations around the world have on the number and types of particles detected? What happens during a solar flare? Join us in helping NASA answer these questions!

For more information about NASA’s Radworks project, visit http://techport.nasa.gov/view/10581.

For more information or to register for the TimPix project, email timpix@researchinschools.org.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA’s Centennial Challenges: Vascular Tissue Challenge

NASA, in partnership with the nonprofit Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, is seeking ways to advance the field of bioengineering through a new prize competition. The Vascular Tissue Challenge offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically functional, human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment.

Competitors must produce vascularized tissue that is more than .39 inches (1 centimeter) in thickness and maintains more than 85 percent survival of the required cells throughout a 30-day trial period. To win an award, teams must demonstrate three successful trials with at least a 75 percent success rate. In addition to the laboratory trials, teams must submit a proposal that details how they would further advance some aspect of their research through a microgravity experiment that could be conducted in the U.S. National Laboratory on the International Space Station.

The first registered team(s) to meet the required guidelines and complete their trials by Sept. 30, 2019, will win the awards.

The Vascular Tissue Challenge prize purse is provided by NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program, part of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. Centennial Challenges, managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, is NASA’s citizen-inventor prize program. It invites the nation to help advance the technologies that will enable us to go to Mars and beyond, as well as improve life on Earth. The New Organ Alliance is administering the competition on behalf of NASA. The alliance is a nonprofit organization focused on regenerative medicine research and development to benefit human disease research and tissue engineering.

For information about the Methuselah Foundation’s New Organ Alliance, official challenge documents, rules and schedule of events, visit https://neworgan.org/vtc-prize.php.

For more information about the Vascular Tissue Challenge, visit https://www.nasa.gov/vtchallenge.


Be a Citizen Earth Scientist With the ‘GLOBE Observer’ App

Want to be a citizen Earth scientist? To contribute to NASA’s studies of our home planet, all you need is a smartphone, access to the outdoors, and the “GLOBE Observer” app.

Now available for Apple and Android phones, the app is an initiative of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment program. For over two decades, GLOBE has enabled schools and students in over 110 countries to investigate their local environment and put their observations in a global context.

To learn more, visit https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/nasa-launches-new-citizen-science-opportunity and http://observer.globe.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub

NASA Education Express Message for Oct. 13, 2016

Posted on by .

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.


New This Week!


Free NASA Educator Professional Development Webinars
Audience: In-service, Pre-service, Home School and Informal Educators
Next Event Date: Oct. 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT

Free Workshop — NASA Resources for Girl Scout Journeys
Audience: Girl Scout Troop Leaders, Girl Scout Volunteers and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Oct. 18, 2016, 7 p.m. EDT

White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Spring 2017 Policy Internship Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Application Deadline: Oct. 28, 2016

Virginia Earth System Science Scholars Program
Audience: Virginia High School Juniors and Seniors
Application Deadline: Oct. 30, 2016


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: Oct. 13, 2016, 1-1:45 p.m. EDT

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA STARS en Español
Audiencia: Todos Los Educadores y Estudiantes
Fecha del Evento: Octubre 13, 2016, 1-1:45 p.m. EDT

2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Students
Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 14, 2016
Entry Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and Other Education Organizations

Call for White Papers: NASA iTech Initiative
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
White Paper Submission Deadline: Oct. 17, 2016
Forum Dates: Dec. 5-8, 2016

Celebrate Solar Week — Fall 2016
Audience: Informal Educators and Students in Grades 5-9
Event Dates: Oct. 17-21, 2016

NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event: Game-Changing Technology
Audience: 5-12 Educators and Students
Event Date: Oct. 19, 2016, at Noon EDT

Free Educator Workshop — Technology Drives Exploration: Deep Space Atomic Clock
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Event Dates: Oct. 19, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: Oct. 20, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series
Audience: Grades 6-8 Educators and Students
Next Webcast Date: Oct. 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT

ROSES-16 Amendment 33: New Program Element — Interdisciplinary Science for Eclipse 2017
Audience: Informal and Higher Education Institutions
Step-1 Proposal Deadline: Oct. 27, 2016

Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment
Audience: Postdoctoral Students
Required Notice of Intent Deadline: Oct. 31, 2016

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 1, 2016

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: Nov. 1, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program
Audience: Organizations Interested in Advancing STEM Learning in Informal Environments
Full Proposal Deadline: Nov. 8, 2016

Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year
Audience: K-12 STEM Educators
Application Deadline: Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST

NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity
Audience: Informal Educators, Higher Education Educators and Students
Proposal Deadline: Nov. 22, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

NASA Unveils New Public Web Portal for Research Results
Audience: All Educators and Students

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!


Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

NASA Weathering the Storm — Earth Right Now: Space Weather
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades PreK-12
Event Date: Oct. 17, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
During this webinar about space weather, participants will learn how radiation impacts Earth and how it affects planning for space travel and the upcoming journey to Mars. Attendees also will learn about current research going on at NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center in California. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/196772

NASA Weathering the Storm — Earth Right Now: What Do We Know About Snow?
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-10
Event Date: Oct. 18, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Investigate ways to use snow studies to explore climate science. Participants will explore lessons that give students opportunities to complete field research and collect data, including how to take measurements and calculate the snow-water equivalent. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/203251

NASA Weathering the Storm — Earth Right Now: Building for Hurricanes Engineering Design Challenge
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 6-8
Event Date: Oct. 19, 2016, at 5 p.m. EDT
Whether you live in an area prone to hurricanes or not, you’ve seen images of the destruction caused by such storms. Data from satellites like the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, and now the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, have vastly improved our ability to forecast the track of storms, and have led to insights that allow us to know when a storm will intensify. Participants will learn about a student activity that lets students take on the role of a builder to design a building that can withstand a (simulated) hurricane. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/199043

Teachers Connect: NASA Langley Centennial Badge Webinar
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 4-8
Event Date: Oct. 20, 2016, at 4:30 p.m. EDT
As part of its 100th Anniversary celebration, NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia has developed three digital badges geared to middle school learning standards. The badges are intended to make real-world connections to the classroom as a way to teach STEM content through the NASA context. This webinar highlights Earth Right Now teacher and student digital badges that focus on the role of clouds and cloud types in Earth’s energy budget. This webinar will walk through the NASA Educator Professional Development Collaborative digital badge site and introduce the teacher professional development badge as well as digital or printable ways to implement the activities in the classroom. The webinar also will preview the Journey to Mars and Aeronautics digital badges. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/205370

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.


Free Workshop — NASA Resources for Girl Scout Journeys

Discover ways that NASA resources, missions and content can help support and enrich your Girl Scout Journeys. Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Research Center Office of Education for a free professional development workshop to explore how to navigate these resources and how you might incorporate them into your Girl Scout program.

This online event will take place Oct. 18, 2016, at 7 p.m. EDT. To register, visit https://nvite.jsc.nasa.gov/RSVP/?id=s5aty.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Amanda Harvey at amanda.c.harvey@nasa.gov.


White House Office of Science and Technology Policy’s Spring 2017 Policy Internship Program

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy is seeking students for spring 2017 internships. The OSTP advises the President on the effects of science and technology on domestic and international affairs. The office serves as a source of scientific and technological analyses and judgment for the president with respect to major policies, plans and programs of the federal government.

Policy internships are open to interested students from all majors and programs, including law school programs. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who are enrolled, at least half-time, in an accredited college or university during the period of volunteer service. Students in undergraduate, graduate and professional programs in all fields are encouraged to apply.

While these positions are without compensation, the assignments provide educational enrichment, practical work experience and networking opportunities with other individuals in the science and technology policy arena.

Applications for spring 2017 internships are due Oct. 28, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/ostp/about/student.

If you have questions about this opportunity, please contact Rebecca Grimm at rgrimm@ostp.eop.gov.


Virginia Earth System Science Scholars Program

The Virginia Earth System Science Scholars, or VESSS, program is an interactive online science, technology, engineering and mathematics learning experience for Virginia high school juniors and seniors. The program will select 175 high school juniors and seniors statewide to participate in the inaugural offering of the online course from December 2016 through April 2017. Three dual-enrollment college credits will be offered through Thomas Nelson Community College with costs underwritten by the Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

About 90 students who perform well in the online course will be selected to attend one of two one-week residential summer academies at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. At the academy, students will work with mentors to apply course content and NASA data to real-world applications. It is anticipated that one additional college credit will be offered for successful completion of the academy.

VESSS partners include the Hampton University Center for Atmospheric Research and Education, NASA’s Langley Research Center, and Thomas Nelson Community College.

Applications are due Oct. 30, 2016.

For more information and to complete the online application for the 2016-2017 course, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/VESSS/.

Please email any questions about this program to Joyce Corriere at jcorrier@odu.edu.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…


Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” mailing list. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — Live Video Chat: NASA STARS en Español

Do you want to be one of NASA’s STARS? In this series of live Spanish video chats, “Students Talk About Real STEM” with NASA professionals who work in these areas. Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network and Educator Professional Development Collaborative for an inside look at NASA missions, research and careers.

The next 45-minute event will be webcast on the NASA DLiNfo Channel on Oct. 13, 2016, at 1 p.m. EDT.

Submit questions via Twitter using #NASASTARS or via email to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com. Or sign up at https://www.txstate-epdc.net/nasa-stars/) for your class to connect directly.
For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln. Please send questions about this event to astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event — NASA STARS en Español

¿Quieres ser uno de los Astros de NASA? En esta serie de video conferencia en español y en vivo, los estudiantes hablarán de lo que es en realidad STEM (ciencias, tecnología, ingeniería y matemáticas) con profesionales de NASA que están trabajando en estas ramas. Acompaña a los programas de conexión digital de NASA (DLN for sus siglas en inglés) y el programa de colaboraciones de desarrolló profesional educativo (EPDC por sus siglas en inglés) hablando de diferentes misiones, investigaciones, y carreras en NASA.

El siguiente programa será transmitido por NASA DLiNfo Channel el 13 de octubre de 2016 a la 1 p.m. EDT.

 Envia tus preguntas por medio de Twitter usando #NASASTARS ó por correo electrónico astrosdeNASA@gmail.com. O inscribe tu escuela y conectate.

Para más información, visite la página https://www.nasa.gov/dln. Escribanos si usted esta interesado en conectarse directo para participar y cualquier pregunta sobre el programa astrosdeNASA@gmail.com.


2017 RASC-AL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge

NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace announce the 2017 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage, or RASC-AL, Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge. This new special edition challenge for 2017 is taking place in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NASA’s Langley Research Center! This design competition is aimed at university-level engineering students and is one of several NASA RASC-AL competitions.

The Mars Ice Challenge requires participants to build a prototype ice drilling system. Teams will compete to extract the most water from simulated Martian subsurface ice at NASA Langley in a three-day competition during summer 2017. During this competition, each participating team will receive a simulated subsurface ice test station composed of solid blocks of ice. The blocks will be in an ice container with a layer of overburden (dirt, rocks, etc.) on top. After drilling through the overburden into the ice, teams must devise innovative solutions to deliver clean water from the ice to an external storage tank (filtering out sediments).

Up to four members of the team (plus the faculty advisor) may travel to NASA Langley for the onsite testing. The drilling and water extraction systems must operate autonomously or via teleoperation, and they are subject to mass, volume and power constraints.

After completion of the test and validation portion of the project, teams will present their drilling concepts to a design review panel composed of NASA judges. Presentations will be based on the team’s technical paper that details the drill concept’s path-to-flight (how the design can be applied to actual drilling on Mars).

Interested teams are encouraged to submit a notice of intent by Oct. 14, 2016, and teams must submit a project plan for their proposed system by Nov. 17, 2016.

A Steering Committee of NASA experts will evaluate the project plans and select up to eight teams to compete against each other at NASA’s Langley Research Center in summer 2017. Each of the selected teams will receive a $10,000 stipend to develop their drilling and water extraction system.

The RASCAL Special Edition: Mars Ice Challenge is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in engineering, science or related disciplines at an accredited university in the United States. University design teams must include (a) one faculty or industry advisor with a university affiliation and (b) two or more undergraduate or graduate students. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

For more information about this competition, visit http://rascal.nianet.org/mars-ice-challenge.

If you have questions about this competition, please contact the RASC-AL team at rascal@nianet.org.


Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visit http://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to GSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.


Call for White Papers: NASA iTech Initiative

NASA iTech is a yearlong initiative to find innovative ideas with the most potential impact on future space exploration and to support development of the most promising solutions. Ideas may come from U.S. small or large businesses, academia, or other government organizations external to NASA. Applicants must be U.S. citizens.

The first step for potential innovators to participate in NASA iTech is to submit a five-page white paper summarizing a proposed innovation to solve challenges in one of the focus areas. These challenges range from crew health to propulsion.

A panel of experts will review all submitted ideas. The top 25 white papers submitted will be recognized by NASA iTech as semifinalists and evaluated by NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist. Innovators representing the top 10 ideas will be invited to present to the agency and its largest contractors at the NASA iTech Forum on Dec. 5-8, 2016, at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

The deadline to submit white papers is Oct. 17, 2016.

For more information, visit http://nasaitech.com/#intro.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Tom Flake at t.g.flake@nasaitech.com.


Celebrate Solar Week — Fall 2016

Solar Week, October 17-21, provides a weeklong series of web-based activities with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. Young people ages 10-14 can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar eclipses, solar energy and solar storms through a series of cool facts, activities and games.

Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. After doing the activities, participants can interact on the bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research. Solar Week is great for learning about our nearest star, the sun.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.


NASA’s Digital Learning Network Event: Game-Changing Technology

In 2013, life changed drastically for the families of 19 firefighters trapped in an Arizona wildfire. The fire shelters that the firefighters were carrying could not protect them. That tragedy inspired scientists and engineers at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Virginia to look at how technology that was developed for inflatable heat shields for spacecraft could be used to prevent this kind of tragedy.

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network for a special webcast on Oct. 19, 2016, at Noon EDT to learn personally from the scientists, engineers and representatives of the National Forestry Service about how they will use this technology to save lives. Viewers may submit questions live during the event.

To join the webcast on the day of the event, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2dtxV18.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.

For more information about other DLN events, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln.


Free Educator Workshop — Technology Drives Exploration: Deep Space Atomic Clock

Precise radio navigation — using radio frequencies to determine position — is vital to the success of a range of deep-space exploration missions. Join NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center Office of Education for an educator professional development workshop on the innovative Deep Space Atomic Clock project — a NASA Technology Demonstration Mission that will revolutionize deep-space navigation.

Participants will hear from Dr. Todd Ely, JPL’s Principal Investigator for the Deep Space Atomic Clock project, about this revolutionary new capability that could forever change the way we conduct deep-space navigation. Through hands-on activities and physical demonstrations, educators will learn how to design, construct and test a simple water clock using the NASA Beginning Engineering Science and Technology for Educators Guide and the engineering design process.

The workshop will take place Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, 4:30-6 p.m. PDT at NASA’s Armstrong Educator Resource Center at the AERO Institute in Palmdale, California.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/atomic_clock_flyer_10_19_16.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Sondra Geddes at sondra.l.geddes@nasa.gov.


2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

Asteroid Anchors, Rock-Climbing Robots, Gecko Grippers and Other Ways to Stick in Space
Event Date:
Oct. 20 and Oct. 21, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=10
The ability to rove the surface of Mars has revolutionized space missions. With more advanced mobility, new targets such as cliff faces, cave ceilings, and the surfaces of asteroids and comets could be explored. Join Dr. Aaron Parness from the Extreme Environment Robotics group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a discussion about the work being done at JPL’s Robotics Rapid Prototyping Lab.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.


Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘STEM in 30’ Webcast Series

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education webcast events called “STEM in 30.” This program consists of live, fast-paced 30-minute webcasts designed to increase interest and engagement in science, technology, engineering and mathematics for students. To enhance the learning experience, students can get involved with the content through the interactive “Cover It Live” feature, which includes poll questions and classroom activities. The webcasts are available live on the National Air and Space Museum website and NASA TV, and they will be archived for on-demand viewing.

Seven Minutes of Terror: The Engineering Behind Landing on Other Planets
Oct. 26, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EDT
Rocket thrusters, giant airbags and a sky crane: These are just a few ways we have landed on other planets. Join the webcast to explore the engineering behind these different techniques and what is in store for future missions.

Scientist or Guinea Pig: Science on the Station
Nov. 16, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
Do you like being poked, prodded and analyzed? If you said yes, then you may have a future as an astronaut. Astronauts on the International Space Station don’t just conduct scientific experiments — they are part of an experiment themselves. Learning about the human factors of spaceflight is an important element to a future trip to Mars. Join the webcast to explore the effects of space on the humans who travel there.

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer
Dec. 14, 2016, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. EST
The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers’ bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers’ 1903 Flyer. The principles of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join the webcast to investigate the principles of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and then into the history books.

“STEM in 30” webcasts are online learning experiences but are filmed in front of a live audience. If you are interested in bringing your school group to a live filming of “STEM in 30,” please email STEMin30@si.edu for details.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “STEM in 30” Webcast Series, including a full list of upcoming webcasts, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/connect/stem-30.

Questions about this series should be directed to STEMin30@si.edu.


ROSES-16 Amendment 33: New Program Element — Interdisciplinary Science for Eclipse 2017
Audience: Informal and Higher Education Institutions
Step-1 Proposal Deadline: Oct. 27, 2016

A total solar eclipse is widely regarded as one of the most incredible natural phenomenon visible from Earth. On Aug. 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will traverse the continental U.S. from Oregon to South Carolina. For approximately 90 minutes, city after city along the centerline will experience two to nearly three minutes of darkness during daytime as totality moves from west to east. While the path of totality will cover a swath only 60 miles wide, the contiguous U.S. States will see at least 65% of the sun disappear behind the moon during its progression of phases. A large fraction of the population in North America is expected to witness this natural event (http://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/).

The purpose of this program element is to support development of new research or enhancement of existing research, applied to the 2017 eclipse. NASA is seeking proposals that would use the special opportunity presented by the solar eclipse to study the sun, Earth, the moon, astronomy, and/or space science, including the ionosphere-thermosphere-mesosphere system. Building on existing partnerships and the use of interdisciplinary or citizen science approaches is encouraged. Citizen science involves public contributions to science, including formulating research questions, conducting experiments, collecting and analyzing data, interpreting results, making new discoveries, and/or developing new/existing technologies and applications. Citizen science is distinguished from public outreach in that the primary purpose of public involvement is to make contributions to science. All proposals must demonstrate links to the 2017 solar eclipse.

Step-1 proposals are due by Oct. 27, 2016.

Step-2 proposals are due by Nov. 30, 2016.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2cZzz8T .

Please direct questions concerning this program element to Madhulika Guhathakurta at madhulika.guhathakurta@nasa.gov.


Postdoctoral Fellowships in Space Biology to Study the Microbiome of the International Space Station as a Built Environment

NASA is seeking proposals from potential postdoctoral fellows to conduct studies to characterize microbial populations isolated from the International Space Station. Selected studies will provide insight into how microbes and microbial populations adapt to spaceflight. Proposed experiments will use microbial isolates collected from the space station that have been archived at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

Proposals will be accepted from graduate students in their final year of their Ph.D. or equivalent degree program; from postdoctoral fellows (Ph.D., M.D., D.D.S., D.V.M., or equivalent doctoral degree from an accredited domestic or foreign institution); or from applicants who received a doctoral degree within the past two years but have not yet had postdoctoral training. Applicants must have no more than four years of postdoctoral research experience at the time of the initial or the subsequent resubmission or revision application. The program is open to U.S. citizens, permanent residents, or persons with pre-existing visas obtained through their sponsoring institutions that permit postdoctoral training for the project’s duration. Sponsoring institutions must be U.S. academic, government or commercial institutions that will provide appropriate mentors.

Interested applicants must submit a required notice of intent no later than Oct. 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://tinyurl.com/NASAMoBE2016.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Dr. David Tomko at dtomko@nasa.gov.


Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is now accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between July 1 – Dec. 31, 2017. Proposals are due Nov. 1, 2016.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, what it is like to work in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut and ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal form, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA; the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL; and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation, or AMSAT. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.


NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA’s mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA’s missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may apply while completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go to https://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity to npphelp@usra.edu.


National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, program. This program seeks to advance new approaches to evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; to provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and to advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.

Proposals are due Nov. 8, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15593/nsf15593.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to DRLAISL@NSF.gov.


Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program Accepting Applications for 2017-2018 Fellowship Year

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program provides a unique opportunity for accomplished K-12 educators in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to serve in the national education arena. Fellows spend 11 months working in a federal agency or U.S. congressional office to bring their extensive classroom knowledge and experience to efforts related to STEM education programs and policy.

To be eligible, applicants must be U.S. citizens who are currently employed full time in a U.S. public or private elementary or secondary school or school district. Applicants must have been teaching full time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a STEM discipline.

Current sponsoring agencies included NASA, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The DOE sponsors up to four placements in U.S. congressional offices.

The Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program is managed by the DOE Office of Science through its Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists, in collaboration with the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education and partnering federal agencies.

Program applications are due Nov. 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. EST and must be submitted through an online application system.

Additional information about the program, including eligibility requirements, program benefits, application requirements and access to the online application system, may be found at http://science.energy.gov/wdts/einstein/.

Please direct inquiries about the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program to sc.einstein@science.doe.gov.


NASA CubeSat Launch Opportunity

NASA has opened the next round of its CubeSat Launch Initiative in an effort to engage the growing community of space enthusiasts who can contribute to NASA’s space exploration goals.

The CubeSat Launch Initiative gives students, teachers and faculty a chance to get hands-on flight hardware development experience in the process of designing, building and operating small research satellites. It also provides a low-cost pathway to space for research in the areas of science, exploration, technology development, education or operations consistent with NASA’s Strategic Plan.

Applicants must submit their proposals electronically by 4:30 p.m. EST, Nov. 22, 2016. NASA will choose the payloads by Feb. 17, 2017, but initial selection does not guarantee a launch opportunity. Certain selected experiments are slated to be flown as auxiliary payloads on agency rocket launches or to be deployed from the International Space Station beginning in 2017 and running through 2020. NASA does not fund the development of the small satellites, and this opportunity is open only to U.S. nonprofit organizations and U.S. accredited educational organizations.

One goal of the CubeSat Launch Initiative is to extend the successes of space exploration to all 50 states by launching a small satellite from at least one participant in each state in the next five years. During this round, NASA is particularly focused on gaining participation in the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and 18 states not previously selected for the CubeSat Launch Initiative. These states are Arkansas, Delaware, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Washington and Wyoming.

CubeSats are in a class of research spacecraft called nanosatellites. The base CubeSat dimensions are about 4 inches by 4 inches by 4 inches (10 centimeters by 10 centimeters by 11 centimeters), which equals one “cube,” or 1U. CubeSats supported by this launch effort include volumes of 1U, 2U, 3U and 6U. CubeSats of 1U, 2U and 3U size typically have a mass of about three pounds (1.33 kilograms) per 1U Cube. A 6U CubeSat typically has a mass of about 26.5 pounds (12 kilograms). The CubeSat’s final mass depends on which deployment method is selected.

To date, NASA has selected 119 CubeSat missions from 66 unique organizations. Of those missions, 46 have been launched into space with 29 more CubeSats scheduled to go in the next 12 months.

For additional information about NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative program, visit http://go.nasa.gov/CubeSat_initiative.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to Jason Crusan at Jason.Crusan@nasa.gov.


Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.


NASA Unveils New Public Web Portal for Research Results

With the launch of a new agency public access portal, public access to NASA-funded research data now is just a click away. PubSpace is a repository of original science journal articles produced by NASA-funded research and available online without a fee.

While the agency always has made access to its research a high priority, the focus now is to make NASA science data more easily obtainable via “one-stop shopping.” This increased public access is intended to accelerate the dissemination of fundamental research results to advance scientific knowledge and help ensure the nation’s future prosperity.

The NASA-Funded Research Results portal was created in response to a 2013 request from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, which directed science-funding agencies to develop plans to increase access to the results of federally funded research. NASA’s public access plan was developed in coordination with the science and technology research community across the agency. NASA will continue to consult with the scientific community, academic institutions, publishers and other federal agencies to implement this plan and increase access to research results.

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/open/researchaccess.


Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you will view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles create some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website at https://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visit http://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Michelle Viotti at michelle.a.viotti@jpl.nasa.gov.


Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.


Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at https://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” message for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/


Visit NASA Education on the Web:
NASA Office of Eduation: https://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: https://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub