Weather Remains 70% Favorable for Oct. 1 NG-14 Launch

NASA commercial cargo provider Northrop Grumman is targeting Thursday, Oct. 1, for the launch of its 14th resupply mission to the International Space Station. The five-minute launch window opens at 9:38 p.m. EDT.

This afternoon’s Wallops Launch Range forecast for Oct. 1 has weather remaining at 70% favorable, with the primary concerns being cloud ceilings and thick clouds.

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket carrying a Cygnus resupply spacecraft is seen as it is transported to the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad-0A, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Terry Zaperach)

An upper level trough and associated frontal boundary will approach the region tonight, providing more humid conditions along with scattered showers and thunderstorms later this afternoon and evening.

A weak low will develop along the front near the Carolinas. That will bring heavy rain and thunderstorm chances in the Wallops region tonight. There are additional rain chances through early morning Wednesday, Sept. 30.

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket carrying a Cygnus resupply spacecraft arrives at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad-0A, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020, at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Photo Credit: (NASA/Terry Zaperach)

Weak high pressure then briefly develops Wednesday into early Thursday, allowing for dry conditions and less clouds before weak upper level energy brings another chance for increased cloudiness and a very slight chance of a sprinkle Thursday night.

Loaded with nearly 8,000 pounds of research, crew supplies, and hardware, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus cargo spacecraft will launch on the company’s Antares rocket from Virginia Space’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The Cygnus spacecraft, dubbed the SS Kalpana Chawla, will arrive at the space station Sunday, Oct. 4. Expedition 63 Commander Chris Cassidy of NASA will grapple Cygnus and Flight Engineer Ivan Vagner of Roscosmos will act as a backup. After Cygnus capture, mission control in Houston will send ground commands for the station’s robotic arm to rotate and install it on the bottom of the station’s Unity module. Cygnus is scheduled to remain at the space station until mid-December, when it will depart the station. Following departure, the Saffire-V experiment will be conducted prior to Cygnus deorbit and disposing of several tons of trash during a fiery re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere approximately two weeks later.

Latest Weather Forecast For Oct. 1 NG-14 Launch Attempt

NASA commercial cargo provider Northrop Grumman is targeting 9:38 p.m. EDT Thursday, Oct. 1, for the launch of its 14th resupply mission to the International Space Station.

The latest Wallops Launch Range forecast for Oct. 1 puts weather at 70% favorable, with the primary concerns being thick clouds and cloud ceiling. 

An upper level trough and associated frontal boundary will approach the region on Tuesday, Sept. 29, providing scattered showers and thunderstorms for much of the day. A weak low will develop along the front near the Carolinas. That will enhance thunderstorm and heavy rain chances
across the Wallops Region Tuesday night. There are additional heavy rain and thunderstorm chances through mid-morning Wednesday, Sept. 30.

Weak high pressure briefly develops Wednesday into early Thursday, Oct. 1, allowing for dry conditions and less clouds before weak upper level energy brings another chance for increased cloudiness and a slight chance of a sprinkle Thursday evening.

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket carrying a Cygnus resupply spacecraft is seen at sunrise on the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad-0A, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2020, at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Photo Credit: NASA Wallops/Patrick Black

Loaded with nearly 8,000 pounds of research, crew supplies, and hardware, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus cargo spacecraft will launch on the company’s Antares rocket from Virginia Space’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The Cygnus spacecraft, dubbed the SS Kalpana Chawla, will arrive at the space station Sunday, Oct. 4. Expedition 63 Commander Chris Cassidy of NASA will grapple Cygnus and Flight Engineer Ivan Vagner of Roscosmos will act as a backup. After Cygnus capture, mission control in Houston will send ground commands for the station’s robotic arm to rotate and install it on the bottom of the station’s Unity module. Cygnus is scheduled to remain at the space station until mid-December, when it will depart the station. Following departure, the Saffire-V experiment will be conducted prior to Cygnus deorbit and disposing of several tons of trash during a fiery re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere approximately two weeks later.

Pre-launch News Conference to Air 1 p.m. EDT Today

NASA commercial cargo provider Northrop Grumman is targeting 9:38 p.m. EDT Thursday, Oct. 1, for the launch of its 14th resupply mission to the International Space Station.

A pre-launch news conference will air at 1 p.m. EDT today, Sept. 28, on NASA TV and at nasa.gov/live. Featured participants include:

  • Greg Dorth, manager, International Space Station Program External Integration Office, NASA
  • Heidi Parris, assistant program scientist, International Space Station Program Science Office, NASA
  • Shannon Fitzpatrick, chief, Wallops Flight Facility Range and Mission Management Office, NASA
  • Frank DeMauro, vice president and general manager, Tactical Space, Northrop Grumman
  • Kurt Eberly, director, Launch Vehicles, Northrop Grumman

Loaded with nearly 8,000 pounds of research, crew supplies, and hardware, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus cargo spacecraft will launch on the company’s Antares rocket from Virginia Space’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport.

The Cygnus spacecraft, dubbed the SS Kalpana Chawla, will arrive at the space station Sunday, Oct. 4. Expedition 63 Commander Chris Cassidy of NASA will grapple Cygnus and Flight Engineer Ivan Vagner of Roscosmos will act as a backup. After Cygnus capture, mission control in Houston will send ground commands for the station’s robotic arm to rotate and install it on the bottom of the station’s Unity module. Cygnus is scheduled to remain at the space station until mid-December, when it will depart the station. Following departure, the Saffire-V experiment will be conducted prior to Cygnus deorbit and disposing of several tons of trash during a fiery re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere approximately two weeks later.

NG-14 Launch Delayed to NET Oct. 1

Northrop Grumman, along with NASA, has rescheduled the Antares and Cygnus launch for the NG-14 mission to NET Thursday, Oct. 1 at 9:38 p.m. EDT due to unfavorable weather conditions. The Antares rocket and Cygnus spacecraft are healthy and ready to support the mission once weather clears.

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket carrying a Cygnus resupply spacecraft is seen at sunrise on the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad-0A, Sunday, Sept. 27, 2020, at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. Photo Credit: NASA Wallops/Patrick Black

Northrop Grumman’s 14th contracted cargo resupply mission with NASA to the International Space Station will deliver nearly 8,000 pounds of science and research, crew supplies and vehicle hardware to the orbital laboratory and its crew. The CRS-14 Cygnus spacecraft is named after the first female astronaut of Indian descent, Kalpana Chawla.

Launch commentary will begin at 9 p.m. EDT Oct. 1 on NASA TV and at nasa.gov/live.

Launch Blog Coverage Concludes

Launch blog coverage had concluded for the launch of the Northrop Grumman Antares rocket and deployment of the Cygnus spacecraft. Follow the space station blog to keep up with the mission’s arrival at the International Space Station. You can also follow @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts. View more photos from the launch at our Flickr gallery

Rocket in the sky
Northrop Grumman Antares CRS-13 Launch (NHQ202002150006)
The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket, with Cygnus resupply spacecraft onboard, launches from Pad-0A, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020 at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

Solar Arrays Successfully Deployed on Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus Spacecraft

Rocket launches into a clear blue sky
The Northrop Grumman Antares rocket, with Cygnus resupply spacecraft onboard, launches from Pad-0A, Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020 at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

The solar arrays have successfully deployed on Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus spacecraft that is on its way to deliver approximately 7,500 pounds of science and research, crew supplies, and hardware to the International Space Station. This is the company’s 13th contracted cargo resupply mission with NASA.

Cygnus is scheduled to arrive at the International Space Station at approximately 4:05 a.m. EST on Tuesday, Feb. 18. NASA TV coverage of the spacecraft’s approach and arrival to the orbiting laboratory will begin at 2:30 a.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website. NASA Flight Engineer Andrew Morgan will grapple Cygnus and NASA astronaut Jessica Meir  will be acting as a backup. After capture, the spacecraft will be installed on the Unity module’s Earth-facing port. NASA TV coverage of the spacecraft’s installation will begin at 6 a.m. EST.

Follow the Cygnus spacecraft’s arrival to the orbiting laboratory on the space station blog and by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts. View more photos from the launch at our Flickr gallery.

Cygnus Vehicle Reaches Orbit

The Cygnus vehicle reached orbit and it will rendezvous with the International Space Station on Tuesday, Feb. 18, at approximately 4:05 a.m. EST.

Follow the Cygnus spacecraft’s arrival to the orbiting laboratory on the space station blog and by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Liftoff of Antares Rocket and Cygnus Spacecraft!

Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus resupply spacecraft is on its way to the station with about 7,500 pounds of science investigations and cargo after launching at 3:21 p.m. EST on Saturday, Feb. 15, from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. At the time of liftoff, the International Space Station was flying 258 statute miles over the western Pacific, northeast of the Northern Mariana Island.

The spacecraft launched on an Antares rocket from the Virginia Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad-0A at Wallops.

Northrop Grumman named the NG CRS-13 Cygnus spacecraft after former astronaut Robert Henry Lawrence Jr. Major Lawrence was selected in honor of his prominent place in history as the first African American astronaut.

This is Northrop Grumman’s 13th cargo flight to the space station and will support dozens of new and existing investigations.

Follow the Cygnus spacecraft’s arrival to the orbiting laboratory on the space station blog and by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Northrop Grumman Poll Confirms: ‘Go for Launch’

T-10 minutes and counting — The launch team is “go” for launch of the Antares rocket and Cygnus spacecraft at 3:21 p.m. EST

Follow launch activities at the launch blog and @NASA_Wallops and learn more about space station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

Antares Rocket Awaiting Liftoff on Pad-0A, Weather 90% Favorable

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket, carrying its Cygnus cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station, is awaiting liftoff this afternoon from Virginia Space’s Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The five-minute window for launch opens at 3:21 p.m. EST today.

The latest forecast stands at 90% favorable for launch, with the primary weather concern being the cloud ceiling.

Join us for countdown updates: NASA TV will be broadcasting live coverage of the launch beginning at 2:45 p.m. EST, which can also be watched live online at nasa.gov/live.

Northrop Grumman’s 13th contracted cargo resupply mission with NASA will deliver about 7,500 pounds of science and research, crew supplies and vehicle hardware to the International Space Station. This mission’s science experiments include an experiment on viruses that can target specific bacteria, an investigation on bone loss in microgravity and more.

Follow launch activities at the launch blog and @NASA_Wallops and learn more about space station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

A Northrop Grumman Antares rocket carrying a Cygnus resupply spacecraft is seen on Pad-0A, Friday, Feb. 14, 2020, at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. (NASA/Aubrey Gemignani)