Dorian – Atlantic Ocean

Aug. 27, 2019 – NASA Analyzes Tropical Storm Dorian Day and Night

Tropical Storm Dorian was approaching the Leeward Islands when NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead from space and snapped a visible image of the storm. When Suomi NPP came by again the satellite provided a night-time image from early morning on Aug. 27.

Daytime image of Dorian
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the western North Atlantic Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Dorian approaching the Leeward Islands on Aug. 26, 2019. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS).

The Leeward Islands are a group of islands in the eastern Caribbean Sea, where the sea meets the western Atlantic Ocean. The Leewards extend from the Virgin Islands east of Puerto Rico, southeast to Guadeloupe and its dependencies.

The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided a visible image of the storm on August 26, 2019. The VIIRS image showed the storm had taken on somewhat of a comma shape. That shape and the storm’s thunderstorm pattern changed over the course of the day because dry air moved into mid-level areas of the storm, suppressing thunderstorm development. A tropical cyclone is made up of hundreds of thunderstorms, so when development is inhibited, it affects the storm’s strength and sometimes the shape of the storm, depending on the direction from which the dry air comes.

By 5 p.m. EDT on Aug. 26, the National Hurricane Center said, “Although the inner-core convection has decreased recently, a recent burst of strong convection (rising air that forms thunderstorms) with cloud tops colder than minus 80 degrees Celsius [indicating powerful thunderstorms with the potential to generate heavy rainfall] has redeveloped just north of the low-level center.”

NIghttime image of Dorian
At 1:06 a.m. EDT (0506 UTC) on Aug. 27, the Suomi NPP satellite passed over Dorian again, and viewed the storm at night and obtained high resolution infrared-band imagery. The nighttime image showed that Dorian appeared to be relatively compact in size with a few overshooting cloud tops and some tropospheric convective gravity waves. Credit: NASA/NOAA/UWM-SSEC-CIMSS/William Straka III

At 1:06 a.m. EDT (0506 UTC) on Aug. 27, the Suomi NPP satellite passed over Dorian again, and viewed the storm at night and obtained high-resolution infrared-band imagery. The nighttime image showed that Dorian appeared to be relatively compact in size with a few overshooting cloud tops and some tropospheric convective gravity waves.

The nighttime image was created by William Straka III, a researcher at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, Space Science and Engineering Center (SSEC Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS). “The Waning Crescent moon, with 12 percent illumination didn’t show many features,” Straka said. “Even with airglow present, though one could see the city lights peeking through the clouds and a lone ship on the southern edge of the storm.”

By August 27, Dorian moved across St. Lucia and into the eastern Caribbean Sea bringing tropical-storm-force winds with it. NHC said the Caribbean composite radar data show that Dorian remains a very compact system and that it still lacks a well-defined inner core.

The National Hurricane Center or NHC posted many watches and warnings on Aug. 27. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic from Isla Saona to Samana. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Martinique, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Puerto Rico. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Dominica, Grenada and its dependencies, Saba and St. Eustatius, Dominican Republic from Isla Saona to Punta Palenque, and the Dominican Republic from Samana to Puerto Plata.

At 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC) on Tuesday, Aug. 27, NOAA’s National Hurricane Center or NHC noted the center of Tropical Storm Dorian was located by surface observations and Martinique radar data near latitude degrees 14.0 North and longitude 61.2 West. That puts the storm’s center just 15 miles (25 km) west-northwest of St. Lucia.

Dorian is moving toward the west-northwest near 13 mph (20 kph), and this motion is expected to continue through tonight, followed by a turn toward the northwest on Wednesday.

Maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph (85 kph) with higher gusts. Slow strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours, and Dorian is forecast to be near hurricane strength when it moves close to Puerto Rico and eastern Hispaniola.

NHC said, “On the forecast track, the center of Dorian will move across the eastern and northeastern Caribbean Sea during the next few days, passing near or south of Puerto Rico on Wednesday [Aug. 28], move near or over eastern Hispaniola Wednesday night, and move north of Hispaniola on Thursday [Aug. 29].“

For updated forecasts, visit: www.nhc.noaa.gov

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

13W – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Aug. 26, 2019 – NASA’s Terra Satellite Finds Some Power in Tropical Depression 13W

Infrared imagery from NASA’s Terra satellite revealed Tropical Depression 13W contained some powerful thunderstorms pushing high into the troposphere as it was moving west in the Philippine Sea toward the Philippines.

Terra image of 13W
On August 26 at 9:15 a.m. EDT (1315 UTC), the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite found strongest storms (yellow) had cloud top temperatures as cold as minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 Celsius). Credit: NASA/NRL

Tropical Depression 13W has already triggered warnings in the Philippines because it is located just east of the country. Philippines warnings include Tropical cyclone wind signal #1 over the following Luzon provinces: Cagayan, Isabela, Quirino, Nueva Vizcaya, Apayao, Abra, Kalinga, Mountain Province, Ifugao, Benguet, Aurora, Nueva Ecija, eastern portion of Pangasinan, northern portion of Quezon including Polillo Island and Catanduanes.

NASA’s Terra satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms and found the most powerful thunderstorms stretching north over the center from west to east. Infrared data provides temperature information, and the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

On August 26 at 9:15 a.m. EDT (1315 UTC), the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite found those strongest storms had cloud top temperatures as cold as minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 Celsius). Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms with the potential to generate heavy rainfall.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the center of Tropical Depression 13W was located near latitude 13.9 degrees north latitude and 128.5 degrees east longitude. That is about 498 nautical miles east of Manila, Philippines. 13W was moving toward the west and toward the Philippines. Maximum sustained winds are near 52 mph (45 knots/83 kph) with higher gusts.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects 13W will move west across the Philippines, before turning northwest towards Hainan Island, China. The system will make final landfall in Vietnam after five days.

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Dorian – Atlantic Ocean

Aug. 26, 2019 – NASA-NOAA Satellite Finds Heavy Rainmaking Ability in Tropical Storm Dorian

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Dorian as it triggered warnings and watches for the  islands of the Eastern Caribbean Sea.

Suomi NPP image of Dorian
NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Dorian in the western North Atlantic Ocean and the VIIRS instrument aboard captured this image of the storm on Aug. 26 at 1:54 a.m. EDT (0554 UTC). Coldest (red) cloud top temperatures were as cold as minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 Celsius). Credit: NASA/NRL

On Monday, August 26, 2019, a Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Barbados, Martinique, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Dominica, Grenada and its dependencies, Saba and St. Eustatius. A Hurricane Watch is in effect for St. Lucia.

Dorian formed as a tropical depression on Saturday, Aug. 24 about 805 miles (1,300 km) east-southeast of Barbados. By 5 p.m. EDT that day, the depression strengthened into a tropical storm and was named Dorian.

NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Dorian in the western North Atlantic Ocean on Aug. 26 at 1:54 a.m. EDT (0554 UTC). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided an infrared image of the storm. Infrared imagery reveals cloud top temperatures, and the higher the cloud top, the colder it is, and the stronger the storm. Coldest cloud top temperatures were as cold as minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 Celsius) and found around the center of circulation, southwest of the center and in fragmented bands of thunderstorms north of the center. Storms with cloud tops that cold have been found to generate heavy rainfall.

Dorian is a small tropical cyclone. Tropical-storm-force winds only extend outward up to 45 miles (75 km) from the center.

Those areas of strong storms with heavy rainfall potential play into the forecast. NOAA’s National Hurricane Center or NHC said that Dorian is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 3 to 8 inches in the Windward Islands from Martinique south to St. Vincent, including Barbados.  Isolated maximum totals of 10 inches are possible across the northern Windward Islands.  Rainfall totals of 1 to 3 inches are expected from the Grenadines, south to Grenada and across Dominica.

Satellite microwave imagery has shown a persistent low-level eye-like feature along with an intermittent mid-level eyewall forming that quickly erodes because of dry air entering the storm in the mid-levels of the atmosphere.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Monday, August 26, the center of Tropical Storm Dorian was located near latitude 12.3 degrees north and longitude 57.7 degrees west. The center of Dorian was about 135 miles (220 km) east-southeast of Barbados. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1002 millibars.

Dorian is moving toward the west-northwest near 14 mph (22 kph) and this motion is expected to continue through Tuesday night [Aug. 27], followed by a turn toward the northwest on Wednesday [Aug. 28]. Maximum sustained winds are near 60 mph (95 kph) with higher gusts.

Some strengthening is forecast during the next few days, and Dorian could be near hurricane strength when it passes through the northern Windward Islands on Tuesday, and is expected to be a hurricane when it moves near Puerto Rico and eastern Hispaniola.

The National Hurricane Center noted, “Hurricane conditions are possible tonight and early Tuesday within the Hurricane Watch area in the Lesser Antilles. Tropical storm conditions are likely in the warning area by late today. Tropical storm conditions are possible within the tropical storm watch area by tonight or Tuesday. Swells generated by Dorian will be affecting portions of the Lesser Antilles by late today. These swells could cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions.”

On the forecast track, the center of Dorian is expected to be near the Windward Islands late today and tonight, and move into the eastern Caribbean Sea on Tuesday. Dorian is expected to pass near or south of Puerto Rico on Wednesday and approach eastern Hispaniola Wednesday night.

For updated forecasts, visit: www.nhc.noaa.gov

By Rob Gutro 
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Bailu (Northwestern Pacific Ocean)

Aug. 23, 2019 – NASA Satellite Catches Tropical Storm Bailu’s U-Shape

NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of Tropical Storm Bailu that appeared to have a U-shape.

On Aug. 23 at 12:55 a.m. EDT (04:55 UTC) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Bailu in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, northeast of the Philippines. Credit: NASA/NRL

On Aug. 23 at 12:55 a.m. EDT (0455 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Bailu in the Philippine Sea. The storm’s has what appears to be a U-shape because of “deepening convection wrapping counterclockwise from the southwest to northeast,” according to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. Deepening convection means stronger evaporation and rising air. Those factors form the clouds that create thunderstorms that make up a tropical cyclone.

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Bailu was located near latitude 19.4 degrees north and longitude 124.5 degrees east. Bailu was about 417 nautical miles south-southeast of Taipei, Taiwan. Bailu was moving to the northwest and had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (51.7 mph/83.3 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Bailu to continue to track northwestward and skim extreme southern Taiwan on Aug. 24, before making landfall in China on Aug. 25. After landfall the system is expected to quickly weaken and is forecast to dissipate by Aug. 26.

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Ivo (Eastern Pacific)

Aug. 23, 2019 – GPM Finds Heavy Rain Occurring in a Weaker Tropical Storm Ivo

Tropical Storm Ivo may have weakened in the overnight hours from Aug. 22 to Aug. 23, but the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite has found that the storm is still generating heavy rainfall over the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

The GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Storm Ivo on Aug. 22 at 10:51 p.m. EDT (0251 UTC, Aug. 23). GPM found the heaviest rainfall (pink) around Ivo’s center of circulation falling at a rate of 25 mm (about 1 inch) per hour. Credit: NASA/JAXA/NRL

As Ivo was moving toward Mexico’s Clarion Island, the GPM satellite passed overhead and analyzed the rain rates throughout the storm on Aug. 22 at 10:51 p.m. EDT (0251 UTC, Aug. 23). GPM found the heaviest rainfall was occurring in a fragmented band of thunderstorms west of the center of circulation where it was falling at a rate of 40 mm (about 1.6 inch) per hour. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Ivo was located near latitude 17.9 degrees n and longitude 114.5 degrees west. That puts the center about 455 miles (735 km) southwest of the southernmost tip of Baja California, Mexico. The National Hurricane Center or NHC said that Ivo is moving toward the north-northwest near 10 mph (17 kph), and this general motion is expected to continue for the next 2 to 3 days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 60 mph (95 kph) with higher gusts. The estimated minimum central pressure is 996 millibars.

NHC noted, “Little change in intensity is expected today, but Ivo should begin to weaken on Saturday [August 24].”

For updated forecasts, visit: www.nhc.noaa.gov.

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Chantal (Atlantic Ocean)

Aug. 23, 3019 – NASA’s Aqua Satellite Writing the End of Depression Chantal’s Story

Tropical Depression Chantal is winding down in the North Central Atlantic Ocean and that was confirmed by infrared data from NASA’s Aqua satellite on August 23.

On Aug. 23 at 12:45 a.m. EDT (0445 UTC), the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite showed strongest storms (yellow) in Tropical Depression Chantal were in two small areas, east and west of center, where cloud top temperatures in those areas were as cold as minus 50 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 45.5 Celsius). Credit: NASA/NRL

The National Hurricane Center or NHC forecasts the end of Chantal’s life story later in the day, as the storm is forecast to become a remnant low pressure area.

On Aug. 23 at 1:30 a.m. EDT (0530 UTC), the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms by providing temperature information about the system’s clouds. The strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

Two areas remained with strongest storms. Those areas were east and west of the center of circulation where cloud top temperatures were as cold as minus 50 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 45.5 degrees Celsius).

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Tropical Depression Chantal was located near latitude 37.1 degrees north and longitude 40.9 degrees west. That places the center of Chantal about 765 miles (1,225 km) west of the Azores Islands. Chantal is moving toward the southeast near 8 mph (13 kph) and is expected to make a slow clockwise loop over the next few days.

Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 30 mph (45 kph) with higher gusts. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1010 millibars.

NOAA’s National Hurricane Center noted, “Additional weakening is forecast, and Chantal is likely to degenerate into a remnant low by tonight. The remnant low could dissipate by late Sunday [Aug. 25] or Monday [Aug. 26].”

For updated forecasts, visit: www.nhc.noaa.gov

Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center 

Bailu – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Aug. 22, 2019 – NASA Measures Rain Rate in Tropical Storm Bailu

The GPM satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and Tropical Storm Bailu and measured its rainfall rates.

GPM image of Bailu
The GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Storm Bailu at 7:26 a.m. EDT (1126 UTC) on August 22, 2019. GPM found heavy rainfall (pink) in a band of thunderstorms extending southwest of Bailu’s center where rain was falling at a rate of 40 mm (about 1.6 inches) per hour. GPM data was overlaid on infrared cloud imagery from Japan’s Himawari-8 satellite. Credit: NASA/JAXA/NRL

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over Tropical Storm Bailu at 7:26 a.m. EDT (1126 UTC) on August 22, 2019. GPM found the heaviest rainfall was in a band of thunderstorms extending southwest of Bailu’s center where rain was falling at a rate of 40 mm (about 1.6 inches) per hour. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.

On August 22 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), Tropical Storm Bailu had maximum sustained winds near 45 knots (52 mph/83 kph). Bailu is forecast to strengthen over the next day and a half. Bailu was centered near 17.3 degrees north latitude and 127.5 degrees east longitude. It was about 576 nautical miles south of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa Island, Japan. It was moving to the west-northwest.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center forecasts calls for Bailu to make landfall in southern Taiwan on August 24 at typhoon status. The Central Weather Bureau of Taiwan is issuing Typhoon Warnings.

For updated forecasts, visit the Central Weather Bureau: https://www.cwb.gov.tw

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Chantal – Atlantic Ocean

Aug. 22, 2019 – NASA’s Aqua Satellite Finds a Weaker Chantal, Now a Depression

Over the last day, winds outside of Tropical Storm Chantal have been weakening the storm in the North Atlantic Ocean. When NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over the storm from its orbit in space on August 22, the storm had weakened to a depression and strongest storms were still confined to the northeast of the center.

Aqua image of Chantal
On Aug. 22 at 12:45 a.m. EDT (0445 UTC), the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite showed strongest storms (red) in Tropical Depression Chantal were still northeast of center, where cloud top temperatures in those areas were as cold as minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 Celsius). Credit: NASA/NRL

On Aug. 22 at 12:45 a.m. EDT (0445 UTC), the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms by providing temperature information about the system’s clouds. The strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures.

The strongest storms were still east of the center of circulation, although they shifted to the northeast today. That displacement of strongest storms from around the center is indicative of vertical wind shear, outside westerly winds pushing against the storm. Storms east of the center had cloud top temperatures as cold as minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 Celsius).

In general, wind shear is a measure of how the speed and direction of winds change with altitude. Tropical cyclones are like rotating cylinders of winds. Each level needs to be stacked on top of each other vertically in order for the storm to maintain strength or intensify. Wind shear occurs when winds at different levels of the atmosphere push against the rotating cylinder of winds, weakening the rotation by pushing it apart at different levels.

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Chantal was located near latitude 39.1 degrees north and longitude 45.7 degrees west. The center of Chantal is about 645 miles (1,035 km) southeast of Cape Race, Newfoundland, Canada. The depression is moving toward the east near 17 mph (28 kph). Chantal is forecast to slow down and make a clockwise loop through the weekend. Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph (55 kph) with higher gusts. The estimated minimum central pressure is 1010 millibars.

NOAA’s National Hurricane Center noted that weakening is expected, and Chantal is forecast to degenerate into a remnant low pressure area by Friday, August 23.

For updated forecasts, visit: www.nhc.noaa.gov

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Ivo (was 10E) – Eastern Pacific

Aug. 22, 2019 – NASA Satellite Finds Tropical Storm Ivo’s Center

Infrared imagery from NASA’s Aqua satellite revealed the strongest thunderstorms within Tropical Storm Ivo were just north of the center of the storm’s circulation. Tropical Depression 10E strengthened into Tropical Storm Ivo by 5 p.m. EDT on August 21.

Aqua image of Ivo
On August 22 at 5:45 a.m. EDT (0945 UTC), the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite showed strongest storms in Tropical Storm Ivo were just north of the center of circulation. Cloud top temperatures in the strong area were as cold as minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 Celsius). Credit: NASA/NRL

NASA’s Aqua satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms. Infrared data provides temperature information, and the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures. On August 22 at 5:45 a.m. EDT (0945 UTC), the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite found those strongest storms just north of the center of circulation and in a fragmented band, extending south of the center. Those areas had cloud top temperatures as cold as minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 Celsius). NASA research has shown storms with cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms with the potential to generate heavy rainfall.

NOAA’s National Hurricane Center or NHC noted, “The cyclone continues to gradually improve in organization. Microwave data show that there is a small eye trying to form beneath Ivo’s small central dense overcast, and satellite intensity estimates are rising.”

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Ivo was located near latitude 15.7 degrees north and longitude 113.6 degrees west. That is about 55 miles (890 km) south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico. Ivo is moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 kph), and a turn to the northwest is expected by tomorrow. Ivo is anticipated to move generally north-northwestward this weekend. Maximum sustained winds have increased to near 65 mph (100 kph) with higher gusts.  The estimated minimum central pressure is 996 millibars.

NHC noted, “Further strengthening is anticipated in the short term since Ivo has a developing inner core and is over very warm waters with moderate wind shear.” Ivo could become a hurricane later tonight or tomorrow, but should begin to weaken on Saturday, August 24.

For updated forecasts, visit: https://www.nhc.noaa.gov

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

Bailu – Northwestern Pacific Ocean

Aug. 21, 2019 – NASA Finds Tropical Depression Bailu Forms East of Philippines

NASA’s Terra satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured an image of newly developed Tropical Depression Bailu, east of the Philippines.

Terra image of Bailu
On Aug. 20, 2019, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Depression Bailu in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

On Aug. 20, 2019, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image of Bailu in the Philippine Sea. The storm appeared somewhat elongated.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the center of Bailu was located near latitude 15.9 degrees north and longitude 130.7 degrees east. Bailu was about 674 nautical miles south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Bailu was moving to the northwest and had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects Bailu to move northwest and make landfall in Taiwan, then proceed to a second landfall in southeastern China.

By Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center