Tune in to Today’s Prelaunch Events for Next Space Station Resupply Mission

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft are rolled out to the launch pad in preparation for the CRS-22 mission.
The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft that will fly on the company’s 22nd commercial resupply services to the International Space Station is now ready for its journey to space. On June 1, SpaceX rolled its Falcon 9 rocket with Dragon attached to Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Liftoff is scheduled for 1:29 p.m. EDT on Thursday, June 3. Photo credit: SpaceX

Beginning at 11 a.m. EDT today, June 2, tune in to NASA TV or the agency’s website for the What’s on Board science briefing, highlighting some of the payloads flying on SpaceX’s 22nd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Following this, at 1:30 p.m., there will be a prelaunch news conference from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Participants include:

  • Joel Montalbano, program manager, International Space Station Program Office
  • Jennifer Buchli, deputy chief scientist, International Space Station Program Office
  • Sarah Walker, director, Dragon Mission Management at SpaceX
  • Mark Burger, launch weather officer, 45th Weather Squadron, Cape Canaveral Space Force Station

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft are scheduled to lift off from Kennedy’s Launch Complex 39A tomorrow, June 3, at 1:29 p.m. EDT. Weather officials with Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s 45th Weather Squadron are predicting a 60% chance of favorable weather conditions for launch, with the primary weather concerns revolving around the cumulus cloud rule and flight through precipitation.

This is the second SpaceX mission to deliver science investigations, supplies, and equipment for NASA under the agency’s second Commercial Resupply Services contract, and it will be the first flight of this particular Dragon spacecraft. Dragon’s pressurized capsule will carry a variety of research, including critical materials that will support dozens of the more than 250 experiments that will occur during Expeditions 65 and 66.

To learn more about some of the scientific research and technology demonstrations aboard this mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/spacex-22-research-highlights.

Dragon Attached to Falcon 9 Ahead of Next Launch to Station

The Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket are seen inside the hangar at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft that will fly on the company’s 22nd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station is now ready for its journey to space. On Thursday, May 27, teams transported the spacecraft from SpaceX’s processing facility at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station into the hangar at nearby Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A, where it was attached to the Falcon 9 rocket. Liftoff of the Falcon 9 is scheduled for 1:29 p.m. EDT on June 3, 2021. Photo credit: SpaceX

The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft that will fly on the company’s 22nd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station is now ready for its journey to space. On Thursday, May 27, teams transported the spacecraft from SpaceX’s processing facility at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station into the hangar at nearby Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A, where it was attached to the Falcon 9 rocket.

Today, June 1, the rocket – with Dragon atop – was rolled out to the launch pad, where it will be raised to a vertical position in preparation for launch. Liftoff of the Falcon 9 is scheduled for 1:29 p.m. EDT on Thursday, June 3. Packed with supplies and payloads bound for the orbiting laboratory, Dragon will deliver critical materials that will directly support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur during Expeditions 65 and 66.

Tune in to NASA TV or the agency’s website for live coverage of prelaunch activities, beginning tomorrow at 11 a.m.

NASA, SpaceX Announce Target Launch Time for Next Resupply Services Mission

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and uncrewed Cargo Dragon just before liftoff at Kennedy's Launch Complex 39A.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and cargo Dragon spacecraft stand poised for launch moments before liftoff at Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida on Dec. 6, 2020, for NASA and SpaceX’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services mission to the International Space Station. The first launch for SpaceX under NASA’s CRS-2 contract, the mission blasted off the pad at 11:17 a.m. EST. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

NASA and SpaceX are targeting 1:29 p.m. EDT on Thursday, June 3, for the company’s 22nd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, topped by the uncrewed Cargo Dragon spacecraft, is scheduled to lift off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

This will be the second SpaceX mission to deliver science investigations, supplies, and equipment for NASA under the agency’s second Commercial Resupply Services contract. To date, SpaceX has completed 21 cargo resupply missions to and from the space station, providing more than 100,000 pounds of supplies and approximately 80,000 pounds of return mass.

Tune in to NASA TV and the agency’s website for live coverage, beginning Wednesday, June 2, with prelaunch activities.

To learn more about the mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/spacex.

SpaceX’s CRS-21 Underway; Upgraded Cargo Dragon En Route to Space Station

Liftoff of SpaceX's CRS-21 mission to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 11:17 a.m. EST on Dec. 6, 2020, carrying the uncrewed cargo Dragon spacecraft on its journey to the International Space Station for NASA and SpaceX’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission. Dragon will deliver more than 6,400 pounds of science investigations and cargo to the orbiting laboratory. The mission marks the first launch for SpaceX under NASA’s CRS-2 contract. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

SpaceX’s upgraded cargo Dragon spacecraft is on its way to the International Space Station after launching atop a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Liftoff occurred at 11:17 a.m. EST.

The first launch for SpaceX under NASA’s second Commercial Resupply Services contract, CRS-21 will deliver supplies, equipment, and materials to directly support dozens of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will occur aboard the orbiting laboratory during Expeditions 64 and 65.

The Nanoracks Bishop Airlock is the first comercially funded airlock bound for the International Space Station on SpaceX's CRS-21 mission.
The Nanoracks Bishop Airlock is packed in the Dragon spacecraft’s trunk on Oct. 12, 2020, inside SpaceX’s processing facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for its ride to the International Space Station aboard the company’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission. Photo credit: SpaceX

Included in this delivery is the Nanoracks Bishop Airlock, the first commercially owned and operated airlock that, once installed, will provide a variety of capabilities to the space station, such as payload hosting, robotics testing, and satellite deployment. It also will serve as an outside toolbox for crew members conducting spacewalks.

Dragon is scheduled to arrive at the space station tomorrow, Dec. 7. At approximately 1:30 p.m. EST, the spacecraft will autonomously dock to the station’s Harmony module – the first automated docking for a SpaceX cargo resupply mission. Live coverage will begin at 11:30 a.m. EST on NASA TV and the agency’s website. NASA astronauts and Expedition 64 Flight Engineers Kate Rubins and Victor Glover will monitor docking operations.

Cargo Dragon’s arrival at the space station will mark the first time two Dragon spacecraft will be docked to the orbiting laboratory at the same time. The Crew Dragon spacecraft, named Resilience, that brought the Crew-1 astronauts has been docked since its arrival on Nov. 16.

The cargo Dragon spacecraft will remain attached to the space station for about one month, after which it will return to Earth with 5,200 pounds of research and return cargo, splashing down in the Atlantic Ocean.

To stay updated on all station activities, follow @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter, as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts. Or, follow along the station blog at: https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/

Dragon Separates from Second Stage

Cargo Dragon separates from the Falcon 9's second stage during CRS-21.
SpaceX’s upgraded cargo Dragon spacecraft separates from the Falcon 9 rocket’s second stage, continuing it’s journey to the International Space Station for the company’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission on Dec. 6, 2020. Photo credit: NASA

The uncrewed cargo Dragon has separated from the Falcon 9 rocket’s second stage, as the spacecraft continues its journey to the International Space Station to deliver critical supplies, equipment, and material to support multiple science and research experiments that will take place aboard the space station.

Dragon is slated to arrive at the orbiting laboratory around 1:30 p.m. EST tomorrow, Dec. 7. It will autonomously dock to the station’s Harmony module – the first automated docking for a SpaceX cargo resupply mission – while NASA astronauts and Expedition 64 Flight Engineers Kate Rubins and Victor Glover monitor docking operations.

Falcon 9 First Stage Sticks the Landing!

CRS-21 first stage landing
The first stage of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket successfully lands on a droneship on Dec. 6, 2020, after carrying the uncrewed cargo Dragon spacecraft to orbit for SpaceX’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission. Photo credit: NASA

The Falcon 9 rocket’s first stage has successfully landed on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship in the Atlantic Ocean. This marks the 100th successful landing of a Falcon 9 first stage, and the 35th landing on a droneship. This was the fourth flight for this particular first stage – one of those being the agency’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission that carried NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station.

Next up, Dragon will separate from the rocket’s second stage to continue its solo journey to the space station.

Main Engine Cutoff, First Stage Separates

The nine Merlin engines in the first stage of the Falcon 9 have finished their burn, and the first stage has separated from the rocket. As the second stage continues carrying Dragon on its flight, the first stage will attempt a landing on the droneship “Of Course I Still Love You” in about five minutes.

LIFTOFF! SpaceX’s CRS-21 On Its Way to Space

Liftoff of SpaceX CRS-21 to the International Space Station.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 11:17 a.m. EST on Dec. 6, 2020, carrying the uncrewed cargo Dragon spacecraft on its journey to the International Space Station for NASA and SpaceX’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission. Dragon will deliver more than 6,400 pounds of science investigations and cargo to the orbiting laboratory. The mission marks the first launch for SpaceX under NASA’s CRS-2 contract. Photo credit: NASA

We have liftoff! At 11:17 a.m. EST, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket climbs away from Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying the uncrewed cargo Dragon spacecraft on its journey to the International Space Station for SpaceX’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission.

The first launch of the company’s upgraded cargo version of Dragon, the spacecraft can now carry more science payloads to and from the orbiting laboratory. Scheduled to arrive at the space station tomorrow, Dec. 7, Dragon will autonomously dock to the station’s Harmony module at about 1:30 p.m. EST, delivering critical supplies, equipment, and materials to support a variety of science research and experiments that will be done in a microgravity environment.

Up Next: Liftoff of SpaceX’s 21st Resupply Services Mission

CRS-21 logoIn approximately five minutes, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and uncrewed cargo Dragon spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida. The rocket has been fueled with RP-1 (rocket-grade kerosene) and liquid oxygen, and Dragon has transitioned to internal power.

In just a few minutes, the final prelaunch checks will take place, and the SpaceX launch director will verify that we are a “go” for launch.

Expedition 64 Crew Set to Receive Special Holiday Delivery Among CRS-21 Payload

The upgraded version of SpaceX’s Cargo Dragon spacecraft is seen before it rolls out to the launch pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
The upgraded version of SpaceX’s Cargo Dragon spacecraft, Dragon 2, is seen atop a Falcon 9 rocket on Dec. 2, 2020, as they prepare to be rolled out to Launch Complex 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the company’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) launch. Photo credit: SpaceX

The Expedition 64 crew aboard the International Space Station will be spending the holiday season a little differently this year. Teams here on Earth are hoping a special delivery arriving on SpaceX’s 21st Commercial Resupply Services (CRS-21) mission will help bring the crew some holiday cheer.

We asked the public, “What would you want supplied if you were spending the holidays in space?” As of Thursday, Dec. 3, more than 550 ideas have been submitted by virtual guests. More than 80% of those submissions mentioned some type of food or drink – from the generic “just give me chocolate, lots of chocolate,” to the more specific, “my Tia Dora’s menudo.”

It turns out, that “food and drink” theme is pretty accurate. Teams with the food lab at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston have packed the following items for the crew to enjoy:

Fresh Food Kit
Apples (Gala) 
Oranges (Navel and Blood)  
Mandarin Oranges 
Lemons

Holiday Bulk Overwrap Bags (BOB)
Cherry Blueberry Cobbler 
Cornbread Dressing 
Cranapple Dessert 
Jellied Cranberry Sauce 
Macaroni and Cheese 
Potatoes Au Gratin 
Roasted Turkey 
Shortbread Cookies 
Southwestern Corn 
Sparkle Gel 
Spicy Green Beans 
French Vanilla Cappuccino 
Wheat Flat Bread

Other Food BOBs
12 standard menu containers 
29 crew-specific menu and coffee tea preference containers 
Six food physiology containers

Also bound for the orbiting laboratory are vehicle hardware, supplies, and critical materials that will support a variety of science and research investigations scheduled to take place in a microgravity environment. Learn more about the CRS-21 mission and the payloads on board at: https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/spacex_crs-21_mision_overview_high_res_0.pdf