Falcon 9 Propellant Loading Underway for SpaceX CRS-14

A Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for liftoffA Falcon 9 rocket is being loaded with propellants in preparation for liftoff from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40, to boost a SpaceX Dragon resupply spacecraft to the International Space Station. Liftoff is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. EDT, for its 14th commercial resupply services mission to the space station.

The SpaceX Falcon 9 is 230 feet-tall and has two-stages topped by the company’s unpiloted Dragon spacecraft. The rocket’s first stage is powered by nine Merlin engines that ignite at T-0. Its second stage has a single Merlin engine that takes over after separation of the first stage. The engines run on a combination of super-cold liquid oxygen and the fuel, RP-1 — highly refined kerosene.

Installed atop the rocket, the 20-foot tall and 12-foot diameter Dragon spacecraft is loaded with cargo bound for the space station. The Dragon offers a pressurized section as well as an unpressurized “trunk” section for additional cargo. Also located in the trunk are the spacecraft’s power-producing solar arrays, which will open shortly after Dragon arrives in orbit.

Photo credit: NASA

SpaceX Falcon 9 Set to Launch Dragon to the International Space Station

Emblem for SpaceX CRS-14Good afternoon from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft are being prepared for liftoff from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Liftoff is targeted for 4:30 p.m. EDT today, with an instantaneous launch window. That means the launch must take place precisely on time in order to reach the orbit of the International Space Station.

The official weather forecast from the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Weather Squadron at Patrick Air Force Base calls for an 80 percent chance for favorable conditions for launch today. The primary launch weather concerns are flight through precipitation and cumulus clouds with the showers.

Today’s launch is a cross-country effort. Launch controllers here at the Florida spaceport are working in concert with teams at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston and SpaceX’s control center in Hawthorne, California.

This launch blog originates from the NASA News Center, a few miles west of the launch pad, here at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, the premier multi-user spaceport.

There’s more to come, so stay with us.

Image credit: NASA

Launch Day Arrives for SpaceX CRS-14

A Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for liftoffA Dragon spacecraft is poised for liftoff atop a Falcon 9 rocket at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40. The launch vehicle will boost the resupply capsule on its 14th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. SpaceX’s Dragon will deliver supplies and equipment supporting numerous science investigations for the crew working aboard the orbiting laboratory. Liftoff is scheduled for today at 4:30 p.m. EDT.

Be sure to join us here at 3:55 p.m. EDT to follow this live blog-cast during the last stages of the countdown and early portions of flight. You also may follow the countdown on NASA Television (https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive) beginning at 4 p.m. EDT for updates.

Read more about the Falcon 9 rocket  and the Dragon spacecraft.

Photo credit: NASA

NASA TV to Air Events Supporting Next Space Station Resupply Mission

A SpaceX Falcon stands ready for lift off at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
A Falcon 9 rocket stands ready for lift off at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 40 in this file photo from April‎ ‎8‎, ‎2016, for SpaceX CRS-8. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Preparations continue as NASA’s commercial cargo provider, SpaceX, is getting ready to launch its 14th resupply mission to the International Space Station. Liftoff is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. EDT Monday, April 2.

Weather forecasters with the U.S. Air Force’s 45th weather squadron at Patrick Air Force Base call for a 80 percent chance for favorable conditions for launch. The primary launch weather concerns are flight through precipitation and cumulus clouds with the showers.

Packed with almost 5,800 pounds of research material, crew supplies and hardware, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

You may follow the prelaunch briefings and the countdown taking place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on NASA Television at: https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

Today, April 1
2:30 p.m. – What’s on Board science briefing
4 p.m. – Prelaunch news conference with representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program, SpaceX and the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Space Wing.

Monday, April 2
4 p.m. – Launch coverage begins for liftoff scheduled for 4:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m. – Post launch news conference at Kennedy with representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program and SpaceX.

For the latest schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:
https://www.nasa.gov/content/spacex-crs-14-briefings-and-events/

Learn more about the SpaceX resupply mission at: https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

NASA TV to Air Events Supporting Next Space Station Resupply Mission

The SpaceX CRS-13 Dragon cargo spacecraft is pictured attached to the International Space Station's Harmony module after it arrived on Dec. 17. 2017. Photo credit: NASA
The SpaceX CRS-13 Dragon cargo spacecraft is pictured attached to the International Space Station’s Harmony module after it arrived on Dec. 17. 2017.
Photo credit: NASA

NASA and SpaceX are preparing for the company’s 14th resupply mission to the International Space Station scheduled for liftoff at 4:30 p.m. EDT, Monday, April 2.

Packed with almost 5,800 pounds of research material, crew supplies and hardware, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The official weather forecast from the U.S. Air Force’s 45th weather squadron at Patrick Air Force Base calls for an 80 percent chance for favorable conditions for launch. The primary launch weather concerns are flight through precipitation and cumulus clouds with the showers.

You may follow the prelaunch briefings and the countdown taking place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on NASA Television at: https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

Sunday, April 1
2:30 p.m. EDT – What’s on Board science briefing
4 p.m. EDT – Prelaunch news conference with representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program, SpaceX and the U.S. Air Force’s 45th Space Wing.

Monday, April 2
4 p.m. EDT – Launch coverage begins for liftoff scheduled for 4:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m. EDT – Post launch news conference at Kennedy with representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program and SpaceX.

For the latest schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:
https://www.nasa.gov/content/spacex-crs-14-briefings-and-events/

Learn more about the SpaceX resupply mission at: https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

Dragon Set to Deliver Supplies to International Space Station

SpaceX's Dragon cargo craft is seen during final approach to the International Space Station on Feb. 23, 2017. The commercial spacecraft carried about 5,500 pounds of experiments and supplies to the orbiting laboratory. Space station crew members used the station's robotic arm, Canadarm2, to capture Dragon. Photo credit: NASA
SpaceX’s Dragon cargo craft is seen during final approach to the International Space Station on Feb. 23, 2017. The commercial spacecraft carried about 5,500 pounds of experiments and supplies to the orbiting laboratory. Space station crew members used the station’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, to capture Dragon.
Photo credit: NASA

Next Commercial Resupply Services Mission: SpaceX CRS-14
Launch Time and Date: 4:30 p.m., Monday, April 2, 2018
Lift Off: Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida
Launch Vehicle: SpaceX Falcon 9, 230 feet-tall
Spacecraft: Dragon, 20 feet high, 12 feet-in diameter
Payload: Dragon will deliver cargo and material to support science investigations aboard the International Space Station.
Return to Earth: After about one month attached to the space station, Dragon will return with results of earlier experiments, splashing down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California.
Payloads on Board: https://go.nasa.gov/2Isu6rt

NASA Invites Media to Upcoming Events Prior to SpaceX CRS-14

Preparations continue for the launch of the next SpaceX delivery of supplies and equipment, including science investigations, to the International Space Station. Launch currently is targeted for no earlier than 4:30 p.m. EDT April 2 from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

A Dragon cargo spacecraft, previously flown on SpaceX’s eighth commercial resupply mission to the space station, will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket and includes the first stage booster previously flown on the company’s 12th resupply mission. This is the second SpaceX resupply mission for NASA using both a reused spacecraft and booster.

NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m. EDT Monday, March 19, to discuss a number of science investigations and instruments included in the 5,800 pounds the Dragon will deliver to the orbiting laboratory. Audio of the teleconference will stream live on NASA’s website.

To participate in the teleconference, media must contact Stephanie Schierholz at 202-358-1100 or stephanie.schierholz@nasa.gov by 5 p.m. Friday, March 16, for dial-in information.

Reporters can still apply for credentials to cover the launch of SpaceX CRS-14 from Florida, but the deadlines to apply are next Monday and Friday. Prelaunch and launch activities will take place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and the Cape. Full details and credentialing deadlines are in the media advisory.

For launch countdown coverage and more information about the mission, visit:
https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Sandra Joseph

SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft Heads for Space Station After Successful Launch

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches Dec. 15 at 10:36 a.m. EST from CCAFS.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the Dragon spacecraft launched Dec. 15 at 10:36 a.m. EST from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Photo credit: NASA

A 4,800-pound care package is on its way to the International Space Station aboard a SpaceX Dragon spacecraft. The company’s 13th commercial cargo mission to resupply the space station began at 10:36 a.m. EST with liftoff aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

After a successful climb into space, the Dragon spacecraft now is in orbit with its solar arrays deployed and drawing power. The rocket’s first stage flew back for a successful landing at SpaceX’s Landing Zone One at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

“This was a fantastic way  to end the year for SpaceX east coast launches,” said Jessica Jensen, director, Dragon Mission Management with SpaceX. “It was a great launch.”

The Dragon spacecraft will deliver science, research, crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory. Science experiments include the Total and Spectral Irradiance Sensor (TSIS-1) that will measure the Sun’s energy input to Earth, the Space Debris Sensor (SDS) that will directly measure the orbital debris environment around the space station for two to three years, and the Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature 7 (ACE-T-7) investigation, which involves the design and assembly of 3-D structures from small particles suspended in a fluid medium, structures that are vital to the design of advanced optical materials and electronic devices. Read more at https://go.nasa.gov/2mMUdSY.

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture of the Dragon spacecraft will begin at 4:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 17 on www.nasa.gov/live, with installation coverage set to begin at 7:30 a.m. Astronauts aboard the station will capture the Dragon using the space station’s robotic arm and then install it on the station’s Harmony module. The Dragon spacecraft will spend about one month attached to the space station, returning to Earth in mid-January with results of previous experiments.

For updates during the mission, visit https://www.nasa.gov/commercialresupply.

Dragon to Rendezvous with Space Station on Sunday

Several thousand pounds of supplies, equipment and experiments are on their way to the crew members aboard the orbiting laboratory. Dragon reached its preliminary orbit and its solar arrays have been deployed. A series of thruster firings are scheduled to allow the Dragon spacecraft to rendezvous with the space station on Dec. 17. Installation coverage is set to begin at 7:30 a.m. Watch it live at www.nasa.gov/live.

NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba will capture the Dragon using the space station’s robotic arm and then install it on the station’s Harmony module. The Dragon spacecraft will spend about one month attached to the space station, returning to Earth in mid-January with results of previous experiments.